stark

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be stark raving mad

To be totally crazy. Don't listen to a word he says, he's stark raving mad! You're stark raving mad if you think that plan will work.
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark naked

Completely naked. I keep having the dream where I walk into my classroom and realize I've forgotten my homework—and that I'm stark naked! We've all come into this world the hard way—stark naked and screaming!
See also: naked, stark

(stark) raving bonkers

Totally crazy or eccentric; filled with an excessive amount of emotion, especially anger or excitement. I know you'll probably think me raving bonkers, but I sold all my possessions and am moving to a small village in China. The announcement drove fans stark raving bonkers, as it will be the first new album the band has released in over 10 years. The boss is stark raving mad after I bungled the expense reports.
See also: bonkers, raving

(stark) raving mad

Totally crazy or eccentric; filled with an excessive amount of emotion, especially anger or excitement. I know you'll probably think I'm raving mad, but I sold all my possessions and am moving to a small village in China. The announcement drove fans stark raving mad, as it will be the first new album the band has released in over 10 years. The boss is stark raving bonkers after I bungled the expense reports.
See also: mad, raving

stark raving mad

Cliché totally insane; completely crazy; out of control. (Often an exaggeration.) When she heard about what happened at the office, she went stark raving mad. You must be start raving mad if you think I would trust you with my car!
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark raving mad

Totally crazy, as in The constant uncertainty over his job is making him stark raving mad. This term, meaning "completely wildly insane," is used both hyperbolically and literally. Versions of this expression appear to have sprung from the minds of great literary figures. Stark mad was first recorded by poet John Skelton in 1489; stark raving was first recorded by playwright John Beaumont in 1648; stark staring mad was first used by John Dryden in 1693. The current wording, stark raving mad, first appeared in Henry Fielding's The Intriguing Chambermaid in 1734.
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark ˈnaked

(British English) (American English buck ˈnaked) completely naked: He always walks around his apartment buck naked.
See also: naked, stark
References in periodicals archive ?
Don't mistake that starkness for depression, it's a vibrant and alive sound, full of a happiness that is not associated with two generations of Mancunian miserabilists from Ian Curtis to Morrissey.
Some of the images are somewhat startling in their starkness but ultimately allowed the researchers to create an amazing three-dimensional model of Nesperennub's head.
Her posthumously released new novel, Notice, achieves a starkness rarely seen outside the of crime novels.
Artists such as Georgia O'Keeffe, and photographers such as Ansel Adams have flocked to this region, as the dry atmosphere, changing light conditions, and desert starkness all are grist for the creator's mill.
The starkness of the black void to the right contrasts dramatically with the bright whiteness of the flecks of straw on the man's sweater that seem to float on the surface and make us think we could dust them from the print.
I like the sculptural aspect of simple beauty in the starkness.
And yet, the very starkness of the need in southern Africa is beginning to force a realization that, without fundamental change, even band-aid solutions won't work.
Lucretian starkness, divine intents, cosmic antitheses as corollaries of enormous cosmic jokes galactic paradox ineluctable part of universal order since Bigbang perversity of Godhead.
Its power lies not only in the starkness of its vision and skillful observation of gender and race, but in its fundamental premise that nothing European in the Americas can survive; that the land will inevitably--no matter how long it takes--revert to Indigenous control.
reminds readers that they usually interpret the events of Good Friday and Easter Saturday from the perspective of Easter Sunday; hence they never fully appreciate the starkness and finality of what the Synoptics assert about the death and burial of Jesus.
At the core of the starkness is the for-profit nature of South African private higher education.
8 fairway, the lake itself and the starkness of the Black Mountains far to the east.
Rothmann describes many of his scenes with a clarity not always found in modern works of fiction: the alien starkness of the Ruhr landscape; a motorcycle ride down the Autobahn on a rainy night; a twist contest at a local tavern; the sumptuousness of an exotic meal prepared by the father's Italian coworkers.
The desert is an outer place of starkness, terror, privation, and beauty; it is above all the locus of an encounter with God.