stark

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be stark raving mad

To be totally crazy. Don't listen to a word he says, he's stark raving mad! You're stark raving mad if you think that plan will work.
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark naked

Completely naked. I keep having the dream where I walk into my classroom and realize I've forgotten my homework—and that I'm stark naked! We've all come into this world the hard way—stark naked and screaming!
See also: naked, stark

(stark) raving bonkers

Totally crazy or eccentric; filled with an excessive amount of emotion, especially anger or excitement. I know you'll probably think me raving bonkers, but I sold all my possessions and am moving to a small village in China. The announcement drove fans stark raving bonkers, as it will be the first new album the band has released in over 10 years. The boss is stark raving mad after I bungled the expense reports.
See also: bonkers, raving

(stark) raving mad

Totally crazy or eccentric; filled with an excessive amount of emotion, especially anger or excitement. I know you'll probably think I'm raving mad, but I sold all my possessions and am moving to a small village in China. The announcement drove fans stark raving mad, as it will be the first new album the band has released in over 10 years. The boss is stark raving bonkers after I bungled the expense reports.
See also: mad, raving

stark raving mad

Cliché totally insane; completely crazy; out of control. (Often an exaggeration.) When she heard about what happened at the office, she went stark raving mad. You must be start raving mad if you think I would trust you with my car!
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark raving mad

Totally crazy, as in The constant uncertainty over his job is making him stark raving mad. This term, meaning "completely wildly insane," is used both hyperbolically and literally. Versions of this expression appear to have sprung from the minds of great literary figures. Stark mad was first recorded by poet John Skelton in 1489; stark raving was first recorded by playwright John Beaumont in 1648; stark staring mad was first used by John Dryden in 1693. The current wording, stark raving mad, first appeared in Henry Fielding's The Intriguing Chambermaid in 1734.
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark ˈnaked

(British English) (American English buck ˈnaked) completely naked: He always walks around his apartment buck naked.
See also: naked, stark

stark raving mad

Insane. Literally this term means “completely, wildly crazy,” a graphic description of manic behavior. Versions of it have appeared since the sixteenth century, including Jonathan Swift’s, “There’s difference between staring and stark mad” (Polite Conversation, 1738). More recently, Robert Barnard piled up colloquial synonyms: “‘Mad as a hatter,’ said Gillian Soames complacently. ‘Stark raving bonkers. Up the wall. Round the twist.’” (Death and the Chaste Apprentice, 1989).
See also: mad, raving, stark
References in periodicals archive ?
Not being a decorator, it is the beauty and starkness of form that moves her work, harking back to Scandinavian design, an influence from her teacher and mentor, Kim Sacks.
Their pics are typified by a bleak starkness that keeps the audience at a safe distance.
Without hysteria, without preaching, Katerina's unadorned parabolic starkness reminds a twenty-first century world, itself growing distant from the calamity of the Holocaust, of the deep outrage it still inflicts.
MacIntyre challenges what he sees as an exaggeration by McDowell of the starkness of the animal-human divide.
In our nine years together my little refractor and I had many great adventures--our first look at Jupiter, viewing the starkness of the lunar landscape, and the elation of "discovering" Saturn.
Meanwhile, down the M62 in Manchester, Doves, I am Kloot and Alfie have picked up on a stark, atmospheric sound which incorporates some of the starkness of Joy Division with an often acoustic, minor key element.
Yet after the starkness and inanimation of the exterior, this super saturated sensory overload is at times overwhelming.
Such moments of singular starkness occur often in Avery.
And should this be too subtle an exercise, Harris concludes his litany of Enlightenment-era objections to medieval models of piety with this rhetorical wallop: "All pretensions to theological knowledge should now be seen from the perspective of a man just beginning his day on the one hundredth floor of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, only to find his meandering thoughts--of family and friends, of errands run and unrun, of coffee in need of sweetener--inexplicably interrupted by a choice of terrible starkness and simplicity: between being burned alive by jet fuel or leaping one thousand feet to the concrete below.
Some of the images are somewhat startling in their starkness but ultimately allowed the researchers to create an amazing three-dimensional model of Nesperennub's head.
Her posthumously released new novel, Notice, achieves a starkness rarely seen outside the of crime novels.
An identical or similar notion of the divine is also operative, according to Kugel, in those biblical texts that display what he calls "starkness" of vision, postulating, for example, a strict dichotomy of right and wrong (Chapter 3) or insisting that God does not tolerate the suffering of the innocent (Chapter 5).
Artists such as Georgia O'Keeffe, and photographers such as Ansel Adams have flocked to this region, as the dry atmosphere, changing light conditions, and desert starkness all are grist for the creator's mill.
The starkness of the black void to the right contrasts dramatically with the bright whiteness of the flecks of straw on the man's sweater that seem to float on the surface and make us think we could dust them from the print.
I like the sculptural aspect of simple beauty in the starkness."