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Related to starkly: tenaciously

be stark raving mad

To be totally crazy. Don't listen to a word he says, he's stark raving mad! You're stark raving mad if you think that plan will work.
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark naked

Completely naked. I keep having the dream where I walk into my classroom and realize I've forgotten my homework—and that I'm stark naked! We've all come into this world the hard way—stark naked and screaming!
See also: naked, stark

(stark) raving bonkers

Totally crazy or eccentric; filled with an excessive amount of emotion, especially anger or excitement. I know you'll probably think me raving bonkers, but I sold all my possessions and am moving to a small village in China. The announcement drove fans stark raving bonkers, as it will be the first new album the band has released in over 10 years. The boss is stark raving mad after I bungled the expense reports.
See also: bonkers, raving

(stark) raving mad

Totally crazy or eccentric; filled with an excessive amount of emotion, especially anger or excitement. I know you'll probably think I'm raving mad, but I sold all my possessions and am moving to a small village in China. The announcement drove fans stark raving mad, as it will be the first new album the band has released in over 10 years. The boss is stark raving bonkers after I bungled the expense reports.
See also: mad, raving

stark raving mad

Cliché totally insane; completely crazy; out of control. (Often an exaggeration.) When she heard about what happened at the office, she went stark raving mad. You must be start raving mad if you think I would trust you with my car!
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark raving mad

Totally crazy, as in The constant uncertainty over his job is making him stark raving mad. This term, meaning "completely wildly insane," is used both hyperbolically and literally. Versions of this expression appear to have sprung from the minds of great literary figures. Stark mad was first recorded by poet John Skelton in 1489; stark raving was first recorded by playwright John Beaumont in 1648; stark staring mad was first used by John Dryden in 1693. The current wording, stark raving mad, first appeared in Henry Fielding's The Intriguing Chambermaid in 1734.
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark ˈnaked

(British English) (American English buck ˈnaked) completely naked: He always walks around his apartment buck naked.
See also: naked, stark

stark raving mad

Insane. Literally this term means “completely, wildly crazy,” a graphic description of manic behavior. Versions of it have appeared since the sixteenth century, including Jonathan Swift’s, “There’s difference between staring and stark mad” (Polite Conversation, 1738). More recently, Robert Barnard piled up colloquial synonyms: “‘Mad as a hatter,’ said Gillian Soames complacently. ‘Stark raving bonkers. Up the wall. Round the twist.’” (Death and the Chaste Apprentice, 1989).
See also: mad, raving, stark
References in periodicals archive ?
The crowning achievement of Maid in America is how it takes a subject that is easily stereotyped and presents compelling stories that are starkly authentic.
Starkly, Fuller relates K's confessions, particularly the torture of a young African woman.
This contrasts starkly with English studies which have emphasised the inherent opposition between these two groups.
In the film's madhouse passages, the grim mise en scene contrasts starkly with the warm glow of nightclubs and cabarets.
Dr Rashmi Shukla, regional director of public health, said: "I welcome the publication of the HDA's report, which starkly sets out the scale of the problem we face.
The starkly vivid illustrations, featuring thick black outlines and rainbow hues, underscore a profound message of faith, acceptance, love, and spiritual wholeness.
Arrived at Pudong Airport in Shanghai (a starkly beautiful, modern facility) somewhat dazed but buzzed by arriving in a new city.
Then the starkly penetrating, unflinching eyes of the Dogon people stare at us from razor-sharp, black-and-white prints, as they must have gazed at Agnes Pataux, the trusted white storyteller with the camera.
Richard McCabe starkly defines the contradictions behind England's efforts to subjugate its first colony: "The act of suppression was regarded as an act of 'charity,' an attitude which eventually gave rise to the claim that the Irish were 'beholding to God for being conquered" (19).
is painting a starkly different picture." The anti-abortion Center for Bio-Ethical Reform claims that the news from Europe proves Population Bomb author Paul Ehrlich to be "almost comically wrong." Ben Wattenberg, the commentator and TV host who coined the phrase "birth dearth," says "the next crisis is depopulation."
What Young reminds us, above all, is that what Fish does best is "to make an absolute out of the relative." The "critic as sophist," we are starkly reminded, is the antipodes to "the critic as conservator." Nominalism, in short and in effect, is his bible in a profane age in which what has historical meaning, time-less, time-tested, time-honored, is unmitigatedly effaced; and in which transcendental "visions of order" are trapped by what Fish terms "the authority of interpretive communities" as an "enigma of change."
eBay's success with auctions contrasts starkly with user experiences in auto industry B2B exchanges.
A very real, very worrisome, dearth of master underwriters, which is starkly revealed in the sheer volume of contract underwriting work being portioned out to those who have tried (or been encouraged) to retire, and are now being lured back.
Most starkly divergent are Washington, which maintains the toughest line of all the members, and Moscow, Baghdad's most important ally on the Council).