stark

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Related to starkest: sundering, divinest

be stark raving mad

To be totally crazy. Don't listen to a word he says, he's stark raving mad! You're stark raving mad if you think that plan will work.
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark naked

Completely naked. I keep having the dream where I walk into my classroom and realize I've forgotten my homework—and that I'm stark naked! We've all come into this world the hard way—stark naked and screaming!
See also: naked, stark

(stark) raving bonkers

Totally crazy or eccentric; filled with an excessive amount of emotion, especially anger or excitement. I know you'll probably think me raving bonkers, but I sold all my possessions and am moving to a small village in China. The announcement drove fans stark raving bonkers, as it will be the first new album the band has released in over 10 years. The boss is stark raving mad after I bungled the expense reports.
See also: bonkers, raving

(stark) raving mad

Totally crazy or eccentric; filled with an excessive amount of emotion, especially anger or excitement. I know you'll probably think I'm raving mad, but I sold all my possessions and am moving to a small village in China. The announcement drove fans stark raving mad, as it will be the first new album the band has released in over 10 years. The boss is stark raving bonkers after I bungled the expense reports.
See also: mad, raving

stark raving mad

Cliché totally insane; completely crazy; out of control. (Often an exaggeration.) When she heard about what happened at the office, she went stark raving mad. You must be start raving mad if you think I would trust you with my car!
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark raving mad

Totally crazy, as in The constant uncertainty over his job is making him stark raving mad. This term, meaning "completely wildly insane," is used both hyperbolically and literally. Versions of this expression appear to have sprung from the minds of great literary figures. Stark mad was first recorded by poet John Skelton in 1489; stark raving was first recorded by playwright John Beaumont in 1648; stark staring mad was first used by John Dryden in 1693. The current wording, stark raving mad, first appeared in Henry Fielding's The Intriguing Chambermaid in 1734.
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark ˈnaked

(British English) (American English buck ˈnaked) completely naked: He always walks around his apartment buck naked.
See also: naked, stark
References in periodicals archive ?
The Prime Minister's reference to possible exit from the EU is his starkest warning yet of the consequence of failure to reform Europe, and echoes Chancellor George Osborne's comment to a German newspaper last week that "in order that we can remain in the European Union, the EU must change".
The admission is one of the starkest yet by Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), which has been criticised for trying to shirk responsibility for the worst nuclear disaster in a generation.
With the two presidential nominees sharply diverging on key policy issues such as the economy, workplace policy and foreign policy, President Obama and Governor Romney will provide the American public with the starkest contrast since 1984 if not 1964.
And the starkest contrast is in health care: 73 percent of state and local government workers--including 83 percent of full-time workers--receive health benefits through their jobs.
This is the starkest warning yet that no member of the Eurozone is immune from the financial debt storm sweeping across Europe," warned Guy Verhofstadt, leader of the Liberals Group, the third biggest group in the European Parliament, Wednesday.
He said the anti-Islamic and anti-Arab slogans sprayed on the mosque's walls were the starkest evidence of "this detestable policy by this entity and that the recurrence of those attacks clearly pointed to the existence of such policy.
1 regularly encountered the attitude among students that religion and the church are bad, while Jesus is good, to put it in its starkest terms.
Speaking to business leaders in Manchester, the Prime Minister issued his starkest warning yet over the potential repercussions of ignoring the Greece crisis, saying he would do "whatever it takes to keep Britain safe" in "these perilous economic times".
Iran's FARS news agency on Saturday provided one of the starkest warnings yet the dispute could result in war, quoting an unnamed military official as saying, "serious damage to the United Arab Emirates would be the first outcome.
Can there be any doubt that their reliance upon the tenets of faith was enforced by the starkest ignorance?
If Mr Miliband is intent on embracing a "new economic approach", we need to be told in the starkest terms what that entails, and why we would all lap it up.
Summary: LONDON - HSBC gave its starkest warning to date that new regulations might force it to leave Britain and warned that problems in Europe had hurt growth elsewhere and created a "very challenging" global economy.
The contrast between the empty silence within the Israeli military checkpoint and the market scenes outside it form one of the starkest symbols of what many Palestinian and international activists call Israeli apartheid.
The rioting is the starkest sign to date of the friction between Tunisia's secular establishment and Islamists who have been growing more assertive since the country's autocratic leader was ousted in a revolution six months ago.
Duvert eviscerates Western society with the patience of the hopeless, a disappointed demi-hermit whose only social contact is the embrace of one of its starkest taboos, "a maniac who reproduces his actions and cravings, a sexual retard, an unmarried man who'd rather fondle brats than father any, a blind person who has never known the beauty of breasts, beards, homelands, factories" In his introduction, Benderson formulates Duvert's claim: "our intimate and private lives are just as wicked--indeed more so, because of their hypocrisy--than the disturbing descriptions in this book" Duvert is unapologetic as Rousseau, and his project is in some senses similar to the Confessions.