stark

(redirected from starkest)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to starkest: sundering, divinest

be stark raving mad

To be totally crazy. Don't listen to a word he says, he's stark raving mad! You're stark raving mad if you think that plan will work.
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark naked

Completely naked. I keep having the dream where I walk into my classroom and realize I've forgotten my homework—and that I'm stark naked! We've all come into this world the hard way—stark naked and screaming!
See also: naked, stark

(stark) raving bonkers

Totally crazy or eccentric; filled with an excessive amount of emotion, especially anger or excitement. I know you'll probably think me raving bonkers, but I sold all my possessions and am moving to a small village in China. The announcement drove fans stark raving bonkers, as it will be the first new album the band has released in over 10 years. The boss is stark raving mad after I bungled the expense reports.
See also: bonkers, raving

(stark) raving mad

Totally crazy or eccentric; filled with an excessive amount of emotion, especially anger or excitement. I know you'll probably think I'm raving mad, but I sold all my possessions and am moving to a small village in China. The announcement drove fans stark raving mad, as it will be the first new album the band has released in over 10 years. The boss is stark raving bonkers after I bungled the expense reports.
See also: mad, raving

stark raving mad

Cliché totally insane; completely crazy; out of control. (Often an exaggeration.) When she heard about what happened at the office, she went stark raving mad. You must be start raving mad if you think I would trust you with my car!
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark raving mad

Totally crazy, as in The constant uncertainty over his job is making him stark raving mad. This term, meaning "completely wildly insane," is used both hyperbolically and literally. Versions of this expression appear to have sprung from the minds of great literary figures. Stark mad was first recorded by poet John Skelton in 1489; stark raving was first recorded by playwright John Beaumont in 1648; stark staring mad was first used by John Dryden in 1693. The current wording, stark raving mad, first appeared in Henry Fielding's The Intriguing Chambermaid in 1734.
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark ˈnaked

(British English) (American English buck ˈnaked) completely naked: He always walks around his apartment buck naked.
See also: naked, stark

stark raving mad

Insane. Literally this term means “completely, wildly crazy,” a graphic description of manic behavior. Versions of it have appeared since the sixteenth century, including Jonathan Swift’s, “There’s difference between staring and stark mad” (Polite Conversation, 1738). More recently, Robert Barnard piled up colloquial synonyms: “‘Mad as a hatter,’ said Gillian Soames complacently. ‘Stark raving bonkers. Up the wall. Round the twist.’” (Death and the Chaste Apprentice, 1989).
See also: mad, raving, stark
References in periodicals archive ?
But Anna Pearson, senior policy officer for Help the Aged, said the survey showed "in the starkest terms" that the council tax burden on older people was continuing to grow.
But even media who portray the threat in the starkest terms, she observes, face this truth: People who recognize a problem, but see no clear way to confront it, often turn away completely.
If "Utopia, Utopia" veered a bit too close to cuteness with its relentless iterations of domesticated camouflage, this was not the case with "Superficial Engagement." Here, an ethical question regarding images was posed in the starkest possible terms: Unbearable photographs representing the shattered bodies of war casualties mixed with the complex patterns of abstract art.
Perhaps the starkest example of the impact of globalization on children in Latin America is the growing number of so-called street children.
"The global gag rule therefore forces a cruel choice: In starkest terms, foreign NGOs (nongovernmental organizations) can either choose to accept USAID funds for provision of essential health services--but with restrictions which may jeopardize the health of many patients--or the NGOs can choose to reject the policy and lose vital U.S.
David Rothman of the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons couches the objection in its starkest terms: "To enter the courtroom is to do many things, but it is not to do history."
In service of his thesis, Grisham juxtaposes the starkest extremes of race, class, and morality.
But the starkest moment was when the loud music (Helikopter Quartet by Karlheinz Stockhausen) abruptly dropped off, allowing the action to subside in silence.
Hogan: My job in Washington is to put this issue in the starkest terms.
This is the preeminent defining principle that stands in starkest contrast to the conduct of those against whom President George W.
The city exhibits in its starkest form just about every pathological condition that can afflict a large conurbation.
In this year 2000, the starkest issue facing our conscience is the gulf between the rich and poor worlds.
The pressures for women to join the workforce coincided with a proliferation of the types of jobs that women were better-suited for and a decline in the types of jobs more inherently suited to men: "Put in its starkest form, an information-age economy substitutes mental for physical labor, and in this sort of world women inevitably have a much larger role to play." The increase in illegitimacy, divorce, single motherhood, and working moms led, in turn, to more crime, which led to gated communities and declining trust.
If I use the word hate rather than homophobia or contempt or aggression, it is only because it flames the discussion in the starkest outlines.
Ordinary People offers what I have often thought is one of the starkest representations of an unforgivable sin, or an unforgiving person, and of the deadly aloneness that produces.