stark

(redirected from starker)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

(stark) raving bonkers

Totally crazy or eccentric; filled with an excessive amount of emotion, especially anger or excitement. I know you'll probably think me raving bonkers, but I sold all my possessions and am moving to a small village in China. The announcement drove fans stark raving bonkers, as it will be the first new album the band has released in over 10 years. The boss is stark raving mad after I bungled the expense reports.
See also: bonkers, raving

(stark) raving mad

Totally crazy or eccentric; filled with an excessive amount of emotion, especially anger or excitement. I know you'll probably think I'm raving mad, but I sold all my possessions and am moving to a small village in China. The announcement drove fans stark raving mad, as it will be the first new album the band has released in over 10 years. The boss is stark raving bonkers after I bungled the expense reports.
See also: mad, raving

be stark raving mad

To be totally crazy. Don't listen to a word he says, he's stark raving mad! You're stark raving mad if you think that plan will work.
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark naked

Completely naked. I keep having the dream where I walk into my classroom and realize I've forgotten my homework—and that I'm stark naked! We've all come into this world the hard way—stark naked and screaming!
See also: naked, stark

stark raving mad

Cliché totally insane; completely crazy; out of control. (Often an exaggeration.) When she heard about what happened at the office, she went stark raving mad. You must be start raving mad if you think I would trust you with my car!
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark raving mad

Totally crazy, as in The constant uncertainty over his job is making him stark raving mad. This term, meaning "completely wildly insane," is used both hyperbolically and literally. Versions of this expression appear to have sprung from the minds of great literary figures. Stark mad was first recorded by poet John Skelton in 1489; stark raving was first recorded by playwright John Beaumont in 1648; stark staring mad was first used by John Dryden in 1693. The current wording, stark raving mad, first appeared in Henry Fielding's The Intriguing Chambermaid in 1734.
See also: mad, raving, stark

stark ˈnaked

(British English) (American English buck ˈnaked) completely naked: He always walks around his apartment buck naked.
See also: naked, stark

stark raving mad

Insane. Literally this term means “completely, wildly crazy,” a graphic description of manic behavior. Versions of it have appeared since the sixteenth century, including Jonathan Swift’s, “There’s difference between staring and stark mad” (Polite Conversation, 1738). More recently, Robert Barnard piled up colloquial synonyms: “‘Mad as a hatter,’ said Gillian Soames complacently. ‘Stark raving bonkers. Up the wall. Round the twist.’” (Death and the Chaste Apprentice, 1989).
See also: mad, raving, stark
References in periodicals archive ?
And reading through the new report, I'm left wondering: What if Starker had been tasked with providing a plan for comprehensive park system management?
Indeed both of Starker's brothers were killed in a labor camp and he himself narrowly escaped death several times.
One such is the RAVE (Rapid Vibration Evaluation) program, initially developed by Zeuna Starker, which reduces the modeling time needed for concept evaluation from four weeks to one day.
Among them are use of non-traditional formats such as discussion, out of class experiences (Harris, 2001; Kranz & Lund, 1998; Lund, Kranz, & Porter, 1998), and bibliotherapy (Atwater & Smith, 1982: Ellis, 1993: Santrock, Minnett, & Campbell, 1994; Smith & Burkhalter, 1987; Starker, 1988).
Using the new knuckle-joint press, Zeuna Starker has increased output by 20-25% and extended tooling life by 40 -- 50%, reports the company.
The original Starker exchange earned its name from the court ruling that validated it, Starker v.
It will be starker on a grey day, or in the rain, or the fog.
The use of deferred like-kind exchanges--especially those involving real estate--grew dramatically after the Ninth Circuit's decision in Starker v.
THE contrast between England's uptight PR operation and the openness of other national teams seems starker than ever in France.
Speaking at the launch of a major new book into last March's poll on whether to give the Assembly full primary lawmaking powers, Roger Lewis, the chair of the Yes campaign, said the consequences of it were "perhaps even starker".
Portas said: "With town centre vacancy rates doubling over the last two years, the need to take action to save our high streets has never been starker."
They particularly emphasize the security aspects that have been thrown into starker relief by recent terrorist attacks; and the questions of citizenship, identity, and host-guest interaction.
O'Neil finds a rich backdrop for life's starker passages, a place curiously conducive to allegory and ritual, where the passions and fantasies of humankind are enacted against a frigid and impassive Mother Nature.
Starker lined up a delayed swap involving timberland, Nelson said.