stare

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Related to stares: steers

be staring (one) in the face

1. To be an unavoidable situation or issue. I know you don't want to pay for this expensive course of treatment, but if you keep ignoring your health, a hospital stay will be staring you in the face.
2. To be very obvious, especially suddenly. Thanks to all of those failed experiments, the solution is finally staring me in the face! Unfortunately, the solution—to break up—had been staring us in the face all along.
See also: face, stare

stare (someone or something) in the face

1. Literally, to make direct and uninterrupted eye contact with someone. She just walked up to the boss, stared him in the face, and asked for a raise! I could never do that!
2. To confront a situation or issue directly. The suffragettes stared injustice in the face and won the right to vote.
See also: face, stare

be staring something in the face

To be likely to experience or be affected by something, usually something unpleasant. Janet was staring death in the face for weeks—she really made a miraculous recovery
See also: face, something, stare

fix (someone) with a look

To look at someone intensely. He fixed me with a look, and I found myself mesmerized by what he was saying.
See also: fix, look

fix (someone) with a stare

To look at someone intensely. He fixed me with a stare, and I found myself mesmerized by what he was saying.
See also: fix, stare

fix (someone) with a gaze

To look at someone intensely. He fixed me with a gaze, and I found myself mesmerized by what he was saying.
See also: fix, gaze

be looking (one) in the face

1. To be an unavoidable situation or issue. I know you don't want to pay for this expensive course of treatment, but if you keep ignoring your health, a hospital stay will be looking you in the face.
2. To be very obvious, especially suddenly. Thanks to all of those failed experiments, the solution is finally looking me in the face! Unfortunately, the solution—to break up—had been looking us in the face all along.
See also: face, look

stare (off) into space

To stare vacantly or absentmindedly at nothing in particular, usually while one is preoccupied with or distracted by thoughts of something else. I sat at the back of class, staring off into space, when suddenly the solution came to me. He just stared into space as his parents lectured him on the importance of paying attention during class.
See also: space, stare

give someone a blank look

 and give someone a blank stare
to look back at someone with a neutral look on one's face. After I told her to stop smoking, she just gave me a blank look and kept puffing.
See also: blank, give, look

look someone in the face

 and look someone in the eye; stare someone in the face
Fig. to face someone directly. (Facing someone this way is a sign of sincerity.) I don't believe you. Look me in the eye and say that, She looked him in the face and said she never wanted to see him again.
See also: face, look

stare at someone or something

to look fixedly at someone or something. Why are you staring at me? I was staring at the scenery behind you.
See also: stare

stare into something

to gaze fixedly into something. she just sat there, staring into space. Tom stared into the water, hoping to see a fish or maybe a turtle.
See also: stare

stare out at someone or something

 
1. to be in a place staring outward at someone or something. I stayed in my little room and stared out at the others having fun in the crisp fall air. We stared out at the deep snow.
2. [for a face or eyes visible in a place] to be seen staring outward from that place. Two bright little cat eyes stared out at me from the basket. Her faced stared out of the tiny window.
See also: out, stare

stare someone down

to pressure someone to capitulate, back down, or yield by staring. Don't try to stare me down. I have nerves of steel. I tried to stare down my opponent, but it didn't work.
See also: down, stare

stare someone in the face

 
1. Go to look someone in the face.
2. [for evidence] to confront someone directly. (Fig. on stare someone in the face; look someone in the face.) Finally, the truth stared me in the face, and I had to admit to myself what had really happened. When the facts in the case stared the jury in the face, there was nothing they could do but acquit.
See also: face, stare

stark raving mad

Cliché totally insane; completely crazy; out of control. (Often an exaggeration.) When she heard about what happened at the office, she went stark raving mad. You must be start raving mad if you think I would trust you with my car!
See also: mad, raving, stark

stare down

Cause someone to waver or give in by or as if by being stared at. For example, Insisting on a better room, he stared down the manager until he got it. This expression alludes to staring at someone without being the first to blink or lower one's gaze. [Mid-1800s]
See also: down, stare

stare in the face

Also, look in the face. Be glaringly obvious, although initially overlooked, as in The solution to the problem had been staring me in the face all along, or I wouldn't know a Tibetan terrier if it looked me in the face. [Late 1600s]
See also: face, stare

stark raving mad

Totally crazy, as in The constant uncertainty over his job is making him stark raving mad. This term, meaning "completely wildly insane," is used both hyperbolically and literally. Versions of this expression appear to have sprung from the minds of great literary figures. Stark mad was first recorded by poet John Skelton in 1489; stark raving was first recorded by playwright John Beaumont in 1648; stark staring mad was first used by John Dryden in 1693. The current wording, stark raving mad, first appeared in Henry Fielding's The Intriguing Chambermaid in 1734.
See also: mad, raving, stark

be staring someone in the face

If the facts about something are staring you in the face, they are very obvious, although you may not yet have realized this. Even when the evidence is staring them in the face they deliberately misread it. Sometimes you're trying to solve a complex problem, and you suddenly realise that the answer has been staring you in the face all along.
See also: face, someone, stare

be staring something in the face

COMMON If you are staring a bad situation in the face, the situation is very likely to happen, or will happen soon. At 5-0 down, she was staring defeat in the face. Some of my patients are actually staring death in the face. Note: You can also say that the bad situation is staring you in the face. Failure was staring Marconi in the face.
See also: face, something, stare

be staring someone in the face

(of a fact or object) be glaringly apparent or obvious.
See also: face, someone, stare

be staring something in the face

(of a person) be on the verge of defeat, death, or ruin.
See also: face, something, stare

look/stare you in the ˈface

(usually used in progressive tenses) (of a fact, an answer, a situation, etc.) be obvious but not noticed: The answer to the problem had been staring her in the face for years but she hadn’t seen it.‘Where’s that book?’ ‘There in front of you, looking you in the face.’
See also: face, look, stare

fix somebody with a ˈlook, ˈstare, ˈgaze, etc.

look directly at somebody for a long time: He fixed her with an angry stare.
See also: fix, somebody

look/stare/gaze into ˈspace

look straight in front of you without looking at a particular thing, usually because you are thinking about something: I asked her twice if she was ready to leave but she just sat there staring into space.
See also: gaze, look, space, stare

stare something in the ˈface

be unable to avoid something: They were staring defeat in the face.
See also: face, something, stare

stare down

v.
To intimidate someone or cause someone to submit by staring: I was able to stare down the lion, and it turned and ran away. If your enemies try to stare you down, just smile back at them.
See also: down, stare

stare in the face

1. To be plainly visible or obvious to (one); force itself on (one's) attention: The money on the table was staring her in the face.
2. To be obvious to (one) though initially overlooked: The explanation had been staring him in the face all along.
3. To be imminent or unavoidable to (one): Bankruptcy now stares us in the face.
4. To be about to experience or undergo (something dire): We are staring bankruptcy in the face.
See also: face, stare
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Stares is encouraged by the initial contact he has had with the Labour leadership at Liverpool City Council.
The larger room contained a Lindgren/ETS double steel-walled, electromagnetically and acoustically shielded chamber and two computers used to record EDA and control the random assignment of stare and no-stare trials.
Be great at your job and the stares will stop and the respect will come.
But the boys in this crowd are the sort of boys who are still afraid of girls, and they do not want to be near Jasmine, they only want to stare at her--long, hard, and lovingly.
In October 2003, ministers of defense and foreign affairs representing the 34 member countries of the Organization of American Stares acknowledged the importance of wise environmental management for improved security throughout the Americas.
The required shape of in-line control valve bodies runs a fluid through two 90-degree turns that inevitably make for pressure losses and limit the valve's flow capacity, Stares said.
He's a CG (Creepy Guy), and you should take Bill's advice not to put up with his crude stares and comments.
An employee who stares at a coworker may violate bans on gender-based harassment in the workplace, California's First District Court of Appeal has ruled.
Each fragment of Venous Flow was a jewel that simultaneously evoked absence and presence: the image of a woman's face as she recounts her lover's death; a pregnant dancer under the moving clouds of a blue sky; an old man's fruitless attempts to play a toy piano that is continually pulled away from him; a woman who stares at the audience to say boldly, "Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.
He stares and stares at the vacant shell which stares back at him, meaningless as a literal fact.
The longer one stares at these sculptures, the more their seeming craft and construction begins, crucially, subtly, to acknowledge itself and fall apart.
In a bid to promote the use of poverty maps by United Nations (UN) member stares and organizations as well as nongovernmental organizations--particularly in the areas of food security and environmental management--the government of Norway has funded the Poverty Mapping initiative, which is run by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, the Arendal (Norway) office of the UN Environment Programme (UNEP)/Global Resource Information Database (GRID), and the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research.
Simpson muttered as he left, ``His daughter always stares at me.