stanza

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stanza

slang In sports, a particular interval of time within a game or match. The score was 1-1 at the end of the first stanza. They had a chance to secure their victory in the top of the ninth stanza, but a two-run homer gave their opponents the lead.

stanza

(ˈstænzə)
n. an inning in baseball or some other division of a ball game. He’s doing better than he was in the last stanza.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Affordances of Form in Stanzaic Narrative Poetry." Narrative, Interrupted: The Plotless, the Disturbing and the Trivial in Literature.
Thus, though it is perhaps best known as the archetypical romantic love poem, "Le Lac" is more an artistic performance than an expression of emotion (Gleize 22).12 Most notably, Lamartine composes the varying syllabic patterns of "Le Golfe" into the fixed stanzaic rhythm of three alexandrines followed by one hexameter.
In a poem that condenses the promise and the tragedy of the Kennedy presidency into a handful of words, the stanzaic and syllabic sequence is startling in its communication of advancement followed by curtailment, featuring three syllables, followed by four, then five, then seven, then two, then three.
(30) As Young notes, this collaboration might help explain the surprising variety of stanzaic patterns noted above, but ascertaining the amount written by each person would still be difficult.
Rather, the most perceptible features of manuscript mise-en-page on Hoccleve's autograph page are used to indicate another aspect of the poetry: Hoccleve's stanzaic form.
For instance, the first monoptic shot--ten static seconds of a field of overgrown weeds before a bramble of brush--sustains the poetic charge of the previous three-minutelong polyopsis in the manner of Dorsky's stanzaic "open form." Yet one might, with equal justification, claim that Hiler has been the primary influence on Dorsky.
After 18 pages of poetry structured somewhat traditionally, he breaks from the stanzaic form to interject paragraphs right as The Present Work is finally reaching a comfortable coherence.
The musicologist Alfred Einstein describes its essence as follows: "it [the moresca] never has stanzaic form, but is rather a show piece for the entertainment of Neapolitan society and Venetian patricians.
Especially effective is the poet's use of each stanzaic transition point to repeat the suggestion (in a varied refrain) that his listener "may follow" the "quiet voice that tells / of small, secluded things," or follow "Beyond the gate / a garden opens on," or through doors to "high bookshelves in a firelit room," or, last, in the firelit room, to "the traceless works of childless men: / All printed there to read." "And you may follow where they lead / or you may look away." The use of the varied refrain is especially skillful in this rhythmically elegant poem
For example, many of his poems utilize strict iambic meter, rhyme schemes, or stanzaic forms.
In his article, Affordances of form in stanzaic narrative poetry, Brian McHale proposes a more specific approach to the study of narrative in lyric poetry.
(315) (10) Likewise, the Stanzaic Morte Arthure (ca.
In some respects, this poem does adhere to the prescriptions of balladry (it tells an action-focused story, briskly and plainly, employing simple stanzaic and syntactic structures), but close reading shows that Trower has also heeded Pound's edict to "make it new." The metre Trower employs consists basically of the three and four-beat iambic lines typical of balladry, but he diverges from it so often and so far afield that the traditional metre and rime-scheme is like a frame showing through free verse cladding (recalling Eliot's admonition that "the ghost of some simple metre should lurk behind the arras of even the 'freest' verse").
Relatively structured stanzaic forms encapsulate the devastating personal experience of Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, who writes of her displacement and return to her birth-country during the Liberian civil war in "Something Death Cannot Know":
69) As "Passing Over" develops over the course of its twenty-five pages, Fin-kelstein makes use of many different stanzaic forms and poetic devices, all of them juxtaposed against one another and gathering significance as the poem develops against the temporal sequence of the Passover ritual.