stand with (one)

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stand with (one)

1. Literally, of two or more people, animals, or edifices, to stand in close proximity to one another. I stood with the rest of the applicants, making nervous chitchat while we waited to be called in for our interview. The mother elephant stood with its babies while they drank from the pool to ward off any potential predators. The fact that the historic building stands with such modern architecture only serves to highlight the antiquity of its design and structure.
2. To be or remain united (in support of or opposition to something). The president promised to stand with other leaders around the world in opposition to the brutal dictatorship that was terrorizing the Southeast Asian country. They promised to stand together with the senator in her attempts at tax reform.
See also: stand

stand with someone

to unite with someone, as in defense. Don't worry. I'll stand with you to the end. He stood with her and they faced the threat together.
See also: stand
References in classic literature ?
There is Napoleon; who, upon the top of the column of Vendome, stands with arms folded, some one hundred and fifty feet in the air; careless, now, who rules the decks below; whether Louis Philippe, Louis Blanc, or Louis the Devil.
The four-strong panel had toured the largest Arabian Travel Market to date, to identify the stands with the biggest 'wow' factor.
As I noted, unless you take your stands with you at the conclusion of every hunt, it's impossible to prevent theft 100 percent of the time.
The line offers professional quality stands with the versatility of being highly portable.
Other stands with different soil types may be covered with grasses and shrublike mountain snowberry.
If you have thought things out and have a plan to access and hunt your stands with specific favorable winds, you could still doom your chances of success by over hunting them.
They blocked completion of a Forestry Agency road through Japan's largest remaining beech forest, forced the agency to abandon its practice of replanting clearcut beech stands with Japanese cedar, and limited the size of clearcuts to around 12 acres.