stand to (attention)

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stand to (attention)

1. To be or become ready for an attack. We were all told to stand to after receiving word that the enemy was preparing to launch an offensive just before dawn.
2. To quickly assume military attention. You become trained to stand to attention when a superior officer enters the room. I quickly stood to, but the general told me to be at ease.
See also: stand
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

stand to

v.
To take up positions for military action: Upon hearing gunfire, the soldiers stood to.
See also: stand
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For instance standing to wash dishes or load a dishwasher involves some activity and therefore burns additional calories.
A year ago, the Football League said they were prepared to allow standing to be re-introduced if the member clubs voted for it, but a resolution seems as far away as ever.
WMI Waste Management Inc., 1996 ABCA 6--the Alberta Court of Appeal upheld denials of public interest standing to challenge the approval of a waste management facility.
Alberta (Environmental Appeals Board), 2013 ABQB 44 the Alberta Court of Queen's Bench upheld a denial of public interest standing to challenge a water licensing decision.
A further uncertainty is created by the fact that agencies use public interest standing to screen parties once hearings are triggered.
Margaret Aspinall, chair of the Hillsborough Family Support Group, warned clubs they would be putting fans' lives at risks by seeking the laws on standing to be relaxed.
Posner stated flatly, "Taxpayers have standing to challenge an executive-branch program, alleged to promote religion, that is financed by a congressional appropriation, even if the program was created entirely within the executive branch, as by Presidential executive order."
"The line proposed by the government (no standing to challenge the conferences, standing to challenge the grants) would be artificial because there is so much that executive officials could do to promote religion in ways forbidden by the establishment clause ...
The justices seemed openly skeptical of Cuno's standing to challenge the Ohio tax credit.