stand your ground


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stand (one's) ground

1. To brace oneself and maintain one's position during or when anticipating an attack. The other team's offense was incredibly aggressive, but our defense stood their ground. Despite the guy's size, I managed to stand my ground during the fight.
2. To refuse to yield, compromise, or be belittled; to stand up against an attack or insult. The boss scoffed at her idea initially, but she stood her ground and explained it in greater detail. He kept offering me less money, but I stood my ground and got the full asking price.
See also: ground, stand

stand your ground

A phrase referring, in the United States, to a law that allows one to use force that would otherwise be illegal against a person that they perceive as posing an immediate threat of serious bodily harm. The name comes from the idea that one can "stand one's ground" rather than retreat. The shooter's state has a stand your ground law, so it's unlikely he'll face any charges, even though the man he shot was unarmed. It's still too early to tell whether the prosecutor will consider this a case of "stand your ground."
See also: ground, stand

stand one's ground

 and hold one's ground
to stand up for one's rights; to resist an attack. The lawyer tried to confuse me when I was giving testimony, but I managed to stand my ground. some people were trying to crowd us out of the line for tickets, but we held our ground.
See also: ground, stand

hold/stand your ˈground

face a situation and refuse to run away: In spite of the enemy’s fierce attack, we stood our ground and eventually they had to retreat.After arguing about future policy for three hours, he was still standing his ground.
See also: ground, hold, stand

stand (one's) ground

1. To maintain one's position against an attack.
2. To refuse to compromise; be unyielding.
See also: ground, stand
References in periodicals archive ?
THE HISTORY OF STAND YOUR GROUND DOCTRINE AND AN EXAMINATION OF
Evolution of Stand Your Ground Law in the United States
More than two-dozen states have passed similar Stand Your Ground laws since Florida adopted the NRA-drafted law in 2005, The Washington Post reported.
Juror B37, who only wished to be referred to by her court ID, said that the jury ultimately made its decision based on the evidence and "because of the heat of the moment and the Stand Your Ground."
Oregon doesn't require a permit to buy a handgun; requires background checks on purchases, including private sales; doesn't require guns to be registered; has no "stand your ground" law; doesn't require open carry permits and has no waiting period to obtain a handgun.
Generally, a Stand Your Ground statute eliminates the duty to retreat.
Without reciting here the statutory provisions of each of the twenty-three so-called "Stand Your Ground" states, (34) a Stand Your Ground statute merely eliminates the Duty to Retreat where one is confronted, through no fault of his own, with a potentially deadly situation.
"We have seen an uptick in shootings based on the passage of these bills across the country," said Coleman, referring to a Texas A&M University study that showed an increase in homicides in states with Stand Your Ground laws.
State Stand Your Ground laws drew national attention and scrutiny following the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin in Florida in 2012.
You must have the right to stand your ground in your home, or on the street or wherever you can legally be, in a free country.
They didn't, because under Florida's Stand Your Ground law, Dunn would have been justified in killing Jordan if he believed the teenager was a threat.
Michael Band, a criminal defense lawyer and former prosecutor explained the Stand Your Ground law this way to The New York Times: "Whether there was a shotgun is not nearly as important under the law as whether Mr.
Since George Zimmerman's acquittal of second-degree murder in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin, "stand your ground" laws, though only indirectly related to George Zimmerman's trial, (1) have captured the nation's attention.
Florida was the first state to adopt a stand your ground law in 2005 in response to the inevitable looting that follows hurricanes and other natural disasters." The Florida Legislature intended to provide assurance to homeowners that the law would protect them in the event that they had to defend against an attacker with deadly force.
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