stand to reason


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

it stands to reason

It is the logical conclusion (that something is the case). It stands to reason that if you don't study, you won't do well on the test.
See also: reason, stand

stand to reason

To be a logical or reasonable conclusion or deduction. Given the pace we've been keeping so far, it stands to reason that we'll be able to finish in about three months. Well, it stood to reason that you'd come here after work, so I thought I'd surprise you.
See also: reason, stand

It (only) stands to reason.

It is only reasonable to hold a certain opinion. It stands to reason that most people will not buy a new car if they don't think they can pay for it. I think he will come back to pick up his check. It only stands to reason.
See also: reason, stand

stand to reason

to seem reasonable. It stands to reason that it'll be colder in January than it is in November. It stands to reason that Bill left in a hurry, although no one saw him go.
See also: reason, stand

it stands to reason

It's reasonable or to be expected. For example, It stands to reason that if we leave late we'll arrive late. [Early 1600s]
See also: reason, stand

stand to reason

Be logical or rational, as in It stands to reason that if you don't like hot weather you shouldn't move to Florida. [Early 1600s]
See also: reason, stand

(it) stands to reason

it is obvious or logical.
See also: reason, stand

it ˌstands to ˈreason (that...)

(informal) it is quite clear, obvious or easy to understand: It stands to reason that the less you eat, the thinner you get.
See also: reason, stand

stand to reason

To be consistent with reason: It stands to reason that if we leave late, we will arrive late.
See also: reason, stand
References in periodicals archive ?
After listening to Stand to Reason director, Jonathan Naess, outline the campaign to overturn the 400 year-old law which bans "idiots" and "lunatics" from standing as MPs and how it was considered a victory to have got a question on this issue raised in the House of Commons, I reflected with my public affairs manager how different it is for us.
Under that scenario, Mitrano adds, "it would stand to reason that we would evaluate the technologies--and our policies--accordingly."
Wouldn't it stand to reason that the hybrid should pick up where the Metro left off?
It would stand to reason that long-term learning in school, rather than cramming and coaching, would be the obvious best form of test preparation for the ACT.
It would stand to reason that Mexican-Americans, so different from other immigrant groups, should encounter greater difficulties and pose greater problems.
If, through our thoughts, we can create negative physiological responses in our body, doesn't it stand to reason that we can likew ise direct our thoughts to increase our performance?