stand one's ground

stand one's ground

Also, hold one's ground; stand fast. Be firm or unyielding, as in You've got to respect him for standing his ground when all the others disagree, or I'm going to hold my ground on this issue, or No matter how he votes, I'm standing fast. This idiom, dating from the early 1600s, originally was applied to an army holding its territory against the enemy, but was being used figuratively as well by the end of the 1600s.
See also: ground, stand
References in periodicals archive ?
Drawing up the courage to stand one's ground did not always have to take place at a voter registration office or a segregated lunch counter.
When faced with a perceived threat of death or serious bodily harm, even if it later proves to be unfounded, a person has the right to use lethal force - to stand one's ground and not retreat.
Unfortunately, someone's rights must yield to another's in the situation where the need to stand one's ground may arise.
All this and other factors still motivate continuing to stand one's ground in the theaters of the "Arab Spring.
Enoch begins by arguing in favor of a moral principle, called Impartiality: "when an interpersonal conflict (of the relevant kind) is a matter merely of preferences, then an impartial, egalitarian solution is called for, and it is wrong to just stand one's ground.
Zimmerman was incited to commit his "crime" by two laws passed by the Florida legislature under the inspiration of right-wing ideologues: the right to carry a concealed weapon and the right to stand one's ground and defend ones person and property with deadly force.
Then there was being called Oliver Twist by one's so-called mates, but provided one could stand one's ground with a suitable rejoinder followed by a smack in the face, the message was soon reluctantly accepted