stand one's ground, to

stand one's ground

 and hold one's ground
to stand up for one's rights; to resist an attack. The lawyer tried to confuse me when I was giving testimony, but I managed to stand my ground. some people were trying to crowd us out of the line for tickets, but we held our ground.
See also: ground, stand

stand one's ground

Also, hold one's ground; stand fast. Be firm or unyielding, as in You've got to respect him for standing his ground when all the others disagree, or I'm going to hold my ground on this issue, or No matter how he votes, I'm standing fast. This idiom, dating from the early 1600s, originally was applied to an army holding its territory against the enemy, but was being used figuratively as well by the end of the 1600s.
See also: ground, stand

stand (one's) ground

1. To maintain one's position against an attack.
2. To refuse to compromise; be unyielding.
See also: ground, stand

stand one's ground, to

To hold to one’s position; to refuse to give in. This expression comes from the military, where from about 1700 it was used in the sense of holding one’s position. Figuratively it was used from the early nineteenth century on. J. S. Mill had it in On Liberty (1859): “It is not easy to see how it [individuality] can stand its ground.”
See also: stand