stand for


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stand for (something)

1. To accept, tolerate, permit, or endure something. Usually used in the negative. You've been insulting me all evening long and I will not stand for it any longer! Our new teacher said she won't stand for talking or fooling around in class.
2. To represent, signify, or exemplify something. The stars and stripes of our flag stand for liberty afforded to individual state governments. A: "What do your company's initials stand for?" B: "Mason, Baxter, and Aiken. They're the three founders."
3. To advocate, support, or endorse something. Our chief stands for justice for all citizens, and I have no doubt that he'll be cleared of these charges. Our country stands for freedom above all else.
See also: stand

stand for something

 
1. to permit something; to endure something. The teacher won't stand for any whispering in class. We just can't stand for that kind of behavior.
2. to signify something. In a traffic signal, the red light stands for "stop." The abbreviation Dr. stands for "doctor."
3. to endorse or support an ideal. The mayor claims to stand for honesty in government and jobs for everyone. Every candidate for public office stands for all the good things in life.
See also: stand

stand for

1. Represent, symbolize, as in The stars and stripes stands for our country. [Early 1600s]
2. Advocate, support, uphold, as in The National Writers Union stands for freedom of the press. [c. 1300] Also see stand up for.
3. Put up with, tolerate. This usage is generally in a negative context, as in Mother will not stand for rude behavior. [Late 1800s] Also see hold still for.
4. stand for something. Have some value or importance, as in She realized that appearances do stand for something. This usage dates from the mid-1800s but was preceded by stand for nothing, meaning "be worthless," dating from the late 1300s. Also see stand in for.
See also: stand

stand for

v.
1. To represent something; symbolize something: In military code, "Charlie" stands for the letter C. What does your middle initial stand for?
2. To advocate or support something: I stand for freedom of the press.
3. To tolerate something; put up with something: We will not stand for rude behavior.
4. To run in some election or for some elected office: The incumbent stood for reelection.
See also: stand
References in periodicals archive ?
As an earbud detangler, the Smarter Stand for iPhone solves problem by letting users easily wrap the cords around the dogbone-shaped stand enough times so the actual headphones can fit snugly inside the spool you create.
Smarter stand for iPhone - tangle free indeed (https://t.co/3ZQcoJGmhg) vine.co/v/bTl7wKndlVl
The Smarter Stand for iPhone is a great earbud detangler, but as an iPhone stand 6 what it was originally designed for 6 the accessory unfortunately falls short.
Eager to help everyone enter deeply into this mystery where God not only changes the bread and wine but also changes us, some pastors encouraged the people to stand for the whole prayer.
For information on Stand For Children events in your area or to receive the free Stand For Children Day 2000
Event Planning Kit, contact the Stand For Children National Office at 1-800-663-4032, tellstand@stand.org, 202-234-0217 (fax) or visit the web site at www.stand.org.
Stand For Children was founded on June 1, 1996, when over 300,000 people gathered at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.
The Big Buddy is an all-steel 15-foot stand for two people, perfect for introducing a newcomer to bowhunting.
Right now the Hollow Stand is our best stand for big bucks.