stand between (someone or something) and (someone or something)

stand between (someone or something) and (someone or something)

1. Literally, to occupy a standing position between two people or things. The umpire had to stand between the two arguing players to prevent them coming to blows. Protestors stood between the bulldozer and the historic building.
2. To prevent or impede someone or something from doing, obtaining, achieving, or being with someone or something else. It's your own cowardice that stands between you and the success you've always dreamed of. Protestors stood between the bulldozer and the historic building. I won't bother you anymore—I don't want to stand between you and Tom.
See also: and, between, stand
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

stand between (someone or something and someone or something else)

to position oneself between things and people, so as to act as a barrier. I don't want to stand between you and your family. We won't stand between you and your goals.
See also: between, stand
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also: