stalk


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(one's) eyes are out on stalks

1. One is looking at someone in a way that indicates sexual interest. Of course he likes you—his eyes are out on stalks every time he sees you!
2. One is looking at something with wonder or awe. My brother loves superhero movies, so his eyes will definitely be out on stalks when he sees the trailer for this one.
See also: eye, on, out, stalk

Facebook stalk

To attempt to learn more about a person (typically someone whom one does not know very well) by looking at their Facebook profile, posts, photos, etc. I Facebook stalked Josh yesterday and saw no signs of a girlfriend, so, you're welcome. Ugh, Facebook stalking people I went to high school with is just depressing anymore. They all have kids and houses and intense careers, and here I am, living at home.
See also: Facebook, stalk

Facebook stalking

The act of attempting to learn more about a person (typically someone whom one does not know very well) by looking at their Facebook profile, posts, photos, etc. I did some Facebook stalking yesterday and saw no signs that Josh has a girlfriend, so, you're welcome. Ugh, Facebook stalking of people I went to high school with is just depressing anymore. They all have kids and houses and intense careers, and here I am, living at home.
See also: Facebook, stalk

fb stalk

To attempt to learn more about a person (typically someone whom one does not know very well) by looking at their Facebook profile, posts, photos, etc. I fb stalked Josh yesterday and saw no signs of a girlfriend, so, you're welcome. Ugh, fb stalking people I went to high school with is just depressing anymore. They all have kids and houses and intense careers, and here I am, living at home.
See also: FB, stalk

fb stalking

The act of attempting to learn more about a person (typically someone whom one does not know very well) by looking at their Facebook profile, posts, photos, etc. I did some fb stalking yesterday and saw no signs that Josh has a girlfriend, so, you're welcome. Ugh, fb stalking of people I went to high school with is just depressing anymore. They all have kids and houses and intense careers, and here I am, living at home.
See also: FB, stalk

stalk in

To enter (some place) in a haughty, stiff, or threatening manner. The entire room fell quiet as the count stalked in without a word. The boss stalked in the office with a horrible scowl on his face, so we knew there was bad news on the way.
See also: stalk

stalk into (some place)

To enter some place in a haughty, stiff, or angry manner. Everyone fell quiet as the count stalked into the room without a word. The boss stalked into the office with a horrible scowl on his face, so we knew there was bad news on the way.
See also: stalk

stalk out

To leave (some place) in a haughty, stiff, or threatening manner. The entire room fell quiet as the count stood up and stalked out without a word. The boss stalked out of the office with a horrible scowl on his face after the financial reports were released.
See also: out, stalk

stalk out of (some place)

To leave some place in a haughty, stiff, or angry manner. Everyone fell quiet as the count stood up and stalked out of the room without a word. The boss stalked out of the office with a horrible scowl on his face after the financial reports were released.
See also: of, out, stalk

stalking horse

1. A political candidate who attempts to supplant the current party leader, solely to gauge how much support the incumbent has. He doesn't actually want to be elected—he's just a stalking horse who's trying to see how fractured our party really is.
2. Something that conceals a person's true intentions. I'm afraid that this deal is just a stalking horse for a more nefarious long-term plan.
See also: horse, stalk
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

stalk in(to some place)

to stride into a place, perhaps indignantly. Carl stalked into the manager's office and began his tirade. He stalked in and began to complain.
See also: stalk

stalk out of

some place to stride out of a place indignantly. Jeff stalked out of the store and went straight to the police. Mary got angry and stalked out of the meeting.
See also: of, out, stalk
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

a stalking horse

1. If you describe an event or an action as a stalking horse, you mean that it is being used to help someone get what they really want at a later date. The development will act as a stalking horse for further exploitation of the surrounding countryside. Limits on union contributions will be a stalking horse to break the relationship between the party and the unions. Note: This expression is usually used to show disapproval.
2. In politics, a stalking horse is someone who stands against the leader of a party to test the strength of any opposition to the leader. They then withdraw in favour of a stronger challenger, if it looks likely that the leader can be defeated. There was even talk of one of them standing for the leadership as a stalking horse for the real contender. Note: You can also use stalking horse before a noun. The notion of a stalking horse challenge at the autumn party conference seemed highly unlikely. Note: Stalking horses were horses that were used by hunters. They were trained to allow their rider to hide behind them, and so get closer to the birds they were hunting.
See also: horse, stalk
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

eyes out on stalks

full of eager curiosity or amazement. informal
1999 Escape This breathtaking graphics accelerator takes 3D game play on PCI systems to a whole new dimension of excitement with imagery so realistic your eyes will be out on stalks.
See also: eye, on, out, stalk
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

stalking horse

A pretext. This term comes from the practice of hunters sometimes dismounting and, hiding behind their horses, stalking game on foot, slowly advancing until they come within shooting distance. The transfer of this practice to a means of concealing a secret plan, or, in politics, to a candidate being used to conceal the candidacy of some other person, took place in the sixteenth century. Shakespeare used it in As You Like It (4.3): “He uses his folly like a stalking-horse and under the presentation of that he shoots his wit.” Time had it on November 21, 1977: “She’s willingly making herself a stalking horse for the ultra right.” British lexicographer Nigel Rees reported that in British politics of the early 1990s, the term was applied to a member of Parliament who stands for election as party leader with no hope of winning, in order to test whether the incumbent leader is challengeable.
See also: horse, stalk
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
For example, maybe a bull elk I've spotted has satellite bulls nearby that could bust me on my stalk, or perhaps he has some cows bedded down below him, necessitating a stalk to drop down onto the bull from higher elevation.
But after hearing how the signaller with 2 Scots became obsessed with Alice and stalked her when he realised she was moving on from their intense relationship, the jury found him guilty of murder.
In this case, to determine the effect of the solid-liquid ratio, the spore suspension was added into the corn stalk medium at a solid-liquid ratio, ranged from 1: 1 to 1: 7 at 28[degrees]C for 72 h.
The classified stalk samples were preserved in plastic bags until test times.
How was water distributed through each celery stalk?
A run of hot weather can result in stalks that taste bitter, or are hollow and tough.
The motivation to stalk is usually dynamic and multi-determined making stalking behavior difficult to categorize.
5--Number of millable stalk/[m.sup.2] :by counting the number of mature stalk in each plot.
Stalk celery is the supermarket version most people recognize.
Raising my binoculars to follow his path of escape, I felt certain I'd missed, and the frustration with another blown stalk began to raise my blood pressure.
A second system for describing stalkers may be seen when looking at those who stalk mental health therapists.
Stalking is serious, often violent, and can escalate over time." "Model Campus Stalking Policy," a collaborative report from SRC (a program of the National Center for Victims of Crime) and the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault, characterizes stalking behaviors as "persistent and frequent unwanted in-person contact, surveillance, and unwanted telephone and other electronic contact." The various technological means to stalk include use of the Internet, e-mail, or social networking sites to gather information, harass, and intimidate; use of cell phones and landline phones; text messaging; global positioning systems (GPS) to track a person's whereabouts; or placing spyware on a victim's computer.
"No contact" orders can bar the alleged stalker from stalking or threatening to stalk; prohibit the alleged stalker from having contact with the victim; bar the alleged stalker from knowingly coming within a specified distance of the victim's home, school or work; or prohibit the alleged stalker from buying or owning firearms.
A study of women who stalk. American Journal of Psychiatry, 158, 2056-2069.