References in classic literature ?
Then there would arise a dispute, and frequently an uproar; and it would be a case of "I beg of you to prove, and to produce witnesses to the fact, that the stake is yours.
What may seem a small sum to a Rothschild may seem a large sum to me, and it is not the fault of stakes or of winnings that everywhere men can be found winning, can be found depriving their fellows of something, just as they do at roulette.
You-all think gold-hunting is the only way to make a stake.
But the men that land big will be them that stake the town sites, organize the tradin' companies, start the banks--"
He wrote "800 rubles" on a card, but while the waiter filled his glass he changed his mind and altered it to his usual stake of twenty rubles.
With this stake came a heavy hammer, such as in households is used in the coal cellar for breaking the lumps.
The girl saw the stake in the village street and the piles of fagots about it and in terror she suddenly realized the portent of these grisly preparations.
No stake that you can offer," Trent answered shortly.
The tribe, under the influence of an indescribable terror, disappeared little by little in the huts, and there was complete solitude around the stake.
Now he was to be the central figure, bound to the stake.
The road through Karamyshevo was more frequented and was well marked with a double row of high stakes.
And when they cut long stakes, sharpened at their upper ends, and set them at intervals upright in the bottom of the pit, his wonderment but increased, nor was it satisfied with the placing of the light cross-poles over the pit, or the careful arrangement of leaves and earth which completely hid from view the work the black men had performed.
The figure at the stake was very still, yet the black warriors were but pricking it.
The circle or double hedge that I had made was not only firm and entire, but the stakes which I had cut out of some trees that grew thereabouts were all shot out and grown with long branches, as much as a willow-tree usually shoots the first year after lopping its head.
It so happened, then, that Rocinante took a fancy to disport himself with their ladyships the ponies, and abandoning his usual gait and demeanour as he scented them, he, without asking leave of his master, got up a briskish little trot and hastened to make known his wishes to them; they, however, it seemed, preferred their pasture to him, and received him with their heels and teeth to such effect that they soon broke his girths and left him naked without a saddle to cover him; but what must have been worse to him was that the carriers, seeing the violence he was offering to their mares, came running up armed with stakes, and so belaboured him that they brought him sorely battered to the ground.