stack the deck (against) (someone or something)

(redirected from stacking the deck)

stack the deck (against) (someone or something)

To make arrangements that result in an unfair advantage over someone or something. (Likened to fixing a deck of playing cards in one's favor during a game.) By dating the boss's daughter, Jeremy has stacked the deck against the rest of us for an early promotion. The mega corporation has been accused of trying to stack the deck by spending millions to influence members of congress.
See also: deck, stack

stack the deck (against someone or something)

 and stack the cards (against someone or something)
to arrange things against someone or something. (Originally from card playing; stacking the deck is to cheat by arranging the cards to be dealt out to one's advantage.) I can't get ahead at my office. Someone has stacked the cards against me. Do you really think that someone has stacked the deck? Isn't it just fate?
See also: deck, stack

stack the deck

or

load the deck

mainly AMERICAN
If you stack the deck or load the deck, you give someone or something an unfair advantage or disadvantage. Mr Howard is doing all he can to stack the deck in favour of the status quo. We've developed a culture where it's really hard to eat well and exercise. We're kind of stacking the deck against ourselves. As you can see, I'm loading the deck so that we get the results we want. Note: A stacked or loaded deck of cards is one that has been altered before a game in order to give one player an advantage.
See also: deck, stack

stack the deck

tv. to arrange things secretly for a desired outcome. (From card playing where a cheater may arrange the order of the cards that are to be dealt to the players.) The president stacked the deck so I would be appointed head of the finance committee.
See also: deck, stack
References in periodicals archive ?
The UK is emerging as an outlier, as the shuttering of coal-fired capacity and the higher carbon pricing is stacking the deck in favour of gas, BMI said.
But the matriarch demands that only a 'perfect' princess can marry her boy, stacking the deck against every candidate with ridiculous challenges, such as, for the rough, brash and inelegant Princess Winnifred the Woebegone (Carla Guevara-Laforteza) from the swampland, a test of 'sensitivity' by placing a pea under the stack of mattresses serving as her bed.
Obama vowed to continue taking action on his own wherever possible but underscored that much more progress could be made if Republicans in Congress were less interested in stacking the deck in favor of those at the top, and more interested in expanding opportunity for all.
They are stacking the deck in favor of natgas for electrical power generation.
Among traditional public schools, the report excludes special education schools while including selective middle and secondary schools; it retains special-education-focused charter schools, thus stacking the deck in its analyses--albeit still not achieving the authors' desired result.
Analysts are labeling this a cabinet ' reshuffle,' but it seems more like simply stacking the deck with jokers.
I'm not stacking the deck here--most of those who commented wrote they believed smartphones and other devices had no place in school.
Waving away talk of stacking the deck for any of the three clashes, Bates continued: "I don't think we can prioritise, we have to go to Saracens with our strongest side, go with an expectation of winning and then we'll see what the damage from that game is.
Our nation's entrepreneurs are having a hard enough time without the IRS stacking the deck against them.
You are stacking the deck against the kids," said Francese.
Surely Chandler knows that he is stacking the deck.
Slaughter has made a point of stacking the deck of the Rules committee with pro-choice Democrats.
Angela Rickman, a senior policy advisor with the organization, notes, "A cynic might suspect the PMRA was stacking the deck in favor of Crompton in order to avoid a potential NAFTA suit.
Far be it from me to suggest that a form of reverse racism is at work here, but one must admit that stacking the deck by beginning a ``lesson'' with such inflammatory questions can easily lead impressionable students further toward ``victimhood'' when these questions - or experiences - may not have previously existed.
How can we take seriously a study which so blatantly seems to be stacking the deck in favor of Dvorak?