stacked


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stack the cards (against someone or something)

To make surreptitious arrangements that result in an unfair advantage over someone or something else. (Likened to fixing a deck of playing cards in one's favor during a card game.) Of course, simply by virtue of his being the boss's son, Jeremy has stacked the cards against the rest of us for an early promotion. The mega corporation has been accused of trying to stack the cards with billions of dollars spent putting political pressure on members of congress.
See also: card, someone, stack

stack Z's

To get some sleep. We've got a pretty long layover before our next flight, so I'm going to try to stack some Z's at the gate. A: "Where's Jeff?" B: "Upstairs stacking Z's. It's been a hard week for him."
See also: stack

well-stacked

slang Buxom. Primarily heard in UK. That curvaceous new receptionist sure is well-stacked!

the cards are stacked against (someone or something)

Someone or something is unlikely to be successful due to some existing circumstances, conditions, or obstacles that are likely to present difficulties. Tiffany wants to pursue a career in modeling, but she's only five feet tall, so the cards are stacked against her. The cards are stacked against their campaign, thanks to a lack of funding.
See also: card, stacked

stack the deck (against) (someone or something)

To make arrangements that result in an unfair advantage over someone or something. (Likened to fixing a deck of playing cards in one's favor during a game.) By dating the boss's daughter, Jeremy has stacked the deck against the rest of us for an early promotion. The mega corporation has been accused of trying to stack the deck by spending millions to influence members of congress.
See also: deck, stack

stack up

1. To gather or accumulate into a large amount. I'm sorry, I'm going to be late for dinner tonight—things have really been stacking up at work all day. With so many bills stacking up, I don't know how we're going to make rent.
2. To compare to or rank against someone or something similar. Well, how does your new car stack up against your old one? He's obsessed with how he stacks up compared to my previous boyfriends.
3. To be logical or believable; to make sense. I listened to Jill's explanation, but I'm still skeptical—something just doesn't stack up. I've been staring at this equation for over an hour, but it just isn't stacking up for me.
See also: stack, up

the odds are stacked against (someone or something)

Someone or something is unlikely to be successful due to some existing circumstances, conditions, or obstacles that are likely to present difficulties. Tiffany wants to pursue a career in modeling, but she's only five feet tall, so the odds are stacked against her. The odds are stacked against their campaign, thanks to a lack of funding.
See also: odds, stacked

the odds are stacked in (someone's or something's) favor

Someone or something is very likely to be successful due to some existing circumstances, conditions, or obstacles that will aid or benefit someone or something. The odds were stacked in the film's favor—an all-star cast, a huge budget, and a great marketing campaign—but it turned out to be one of the biggest flops in the history of the industry. I'd be surprised if she doesn't get the job. With all her connections and experience, the odds are stacked in her favor.
See also: favor, odds, stacked

the cards are stacked in (someone's or something's) favor

Someone or something is very likely to be successful due to some existing circumstances, conditions, or obstacles that will aid or benefit someone or something. The cards were stacked in the film's favor—an all-star cast, a huge budget, and a great marketing campaign—but it turned out to be one of the biggest flops in the history of the industry. I'd be surprised if she doesn't get the job. With all her connections and experience, the cards are stacked in her favor.
See also: card, favor, stacked

the odds are stacked in favor of (someone or something)

Someone or something is very likely to be successful due to some existing circumstances, conditions, or obstacles that will aid or benefit someone or something. The odds were stacked in favor of the film—an all-star cast, a huge budget, and a great marketing campaign—but it turned out to be one of the biggest flops in the history of the industry. Everyone knows the odds are stacked in favor of those who already have business connections through their friends or family.
See also: favor, odds, of, stacked

the cards are stacked in favor of (someone or something)

Someone or something is very likely to be successful due to some existing circumstances, conditions, or obstacles that will aid or benefit someone or something. The cards were stacked in favor of the film—an all-star cast, a huge budget, and a great marketing campaign—but it turned out to be one of the biggest flops in the history of the industry. Everyone knows the cards are stacked in favor of those who already have business connections through their friends or family.
See also: card, favor, of, stacked

stack (something) against (someone or something)

1. Literally, to build and lean a pile of something against something. Investigators found that someone had stacked large crates against the emergency exit, blocking everyone's egress once the fire broke out. You can just stack those boxes against the wall over there.
2. To manipulate some situation or circumstances to make it harder for someone or something to succeed. Typically "the deck," "the cards," or "the odds" is used between "stack" and "against." Often used in passive constructions. The Olympic committed is facing criminal charges for stacking the odds against athletes from particular countries. Of course, simply by virtue of his being the boss's son, Jeremy has stacked the cards against the rest of us for an early promotion. These big corporations stack the deck against any small business that might stand in their way by hiring huge, high-level legal firms to drown them in litigation.
See also: stack

stack the odds against (someone or something)

To create, contribute to, or manipulate a situation in a way that results in an unfair advantage over someone or something else. (Likened to a bookmaker rigging the odds of a betting to ensure that others lose.) Often used in passive constructions. The Olympic committed is facing criminal charges for stacking the odds against athletes from particular countries. These big corporations stack the odds against any small business that might stand in their way by hiring huge, high-level legal firms to drown them in litigation. It feels like the odds are really stacked against you if you want to go into business for yourself.
See also: odds, stack

stack the odds in (someone's or something's) favor

To create, contribute to, or manipulate a situation in a way that results in an unfair advantage over someone or something else. (Likened to a bookmaker rigging the odds of a betting to ensure that they win and others lose.) With our two-day seminar, we'll teach you how to stack the odds in your favor in any business negotiation. These big corporations stack the odds in their own favor by having access to huge, high-level legal firms that can out-litigate any small time business that may stand in their way.
See also: favor, odds, stack

stack the deck in the favor of (someone or something)

To create, contribute to, or manipulate a situation in a way that results in an unfair advantage for someone or something (over someone or something else). Likened to rigging a deck of playing cards in one's favor before a card game. Often used in passive constructions. It just feels like the current system has stacked the deck in favor of the wealthy. When it comes to getting hired, the deck are stacked in favor of those who know how to write a compelling résumé and cover letter.
See also: deck, favor, of, stack

stack the cards in the favor of (someone or something)

To create, contribute to, or manipulate a situation in a way that results in an unfair advantage for someone or something (over someone or something else). Likened to rigging a deck of playing cards in one's favor before a game. Often used in passive constructions. It just feels like the current system has stacked the cards in favor of the wealthy. When it comes to getting hired, the cards are stacked in favor of those who know how to write a compelling résumé and cover letter.
See also: card, favor, of, stack

stack the odds in the favor of (someone or something)

To create, contribute to, or manipulate a situation in a way that results in an unfair advantage for someone or something (over someone or something else). (Likened to a bookmaker rigging the odds of a betting to ensure that they win and others lose.) Often used in passive constructions. It just feels like the current system has stacked the odds in favor of the wealthy. When it comes to getting hired, the odds are stacked in favor of those who know how to write a compelling résumé and cover letter.
See also: favor, odds, of, stack

stack up to (someone or something)

To compare to or rank against someone or something similar, especially in a worthy, respectable, or favorable manner. Well, does the new car stack up to your old one? He's obsessed with how he stacks up to my previous boyfriends. I appreciate that she's giving us another story in this universe, but this new book just doesn't stack up to the original trilogy.
See also: stack, up

cards are stacked against (one)

[informal] luck is against one. I have the worst luck. The cards are stacked against me all the time. How can I accomplish anything when the cards are stacked against me?
See also: card, stacked

have the cards stacked against (one)

 and have the deck stacked against one
Fig. to have one's chance at future success limited by factors over which one has no control; to have luck against one. You can't get very far in life if you have the deck stacked against you. I can't seem to get ahead. I always have the cards stacked against me.
See also: card, have, stacked

have the deck stacked against

one Go to have the cards stacked against one.
See also: deck, have, stacked

stack something up

to make a stack of things. (Also without the up.) Where should I stack them up? Please stack up these boxes.
See also: stack, up

stack up

[for something] to accumulate, as in stacks. Your work is stacking up. You will have to work late to finish it. I hate to let my work stack up. I have to do it sooner or later.
See also: stack, up

cards are stacked against

Many difficulties face someone or something, as in The cards are stacked against the new highway project. This term originated in gambling, where to stack the cards or stack the deck means to arrange cards secretly and dishonestly in one's own favor or against one's opponent. [Mid-1800s]
See also: card, stacked

stack up

1. Measure up, equal, as in Their gift doesn't stack up against mine. This usage alludes to piling up one's chips at poker, and comparing them to those of the other players. [Early 1900s]
2. Make sense, seem plausible, as in Her explanation just doesn't stack up. Also see add up, def. 2.
See also: stack, up

the cards/odds are stacked aˈgainst somebody/something

it is not likely that somebody/something will succeed, because they/it will have many problems or difficulties: The cards are stacked against this plan. The public are against it.

the cards/odds are stacked in ˈfavour of somebody/something

(British English) (American English the cards/odds are stacked in ˈfavor of somebody/something) it is likely that somebody/something will succeed because the conditions are good or because somebody/something has an advantage: The odds are heavily stacked in favour of Manchester United, who are having a very successful season and who will be playing in front of the home crowd.

stack up

v.
1. To arrange something in a stack; pile something: I stacked up the magazines in orderly piles. Don't leave newspapers all over the floor; stack them up neatly.
2. To form into or as if into a stack; accumulate: I've been away for two weeks, and my mail is stacking up.
3. To equal or be of similar quality: The salary and benefits at this company don't stack up against those offered by larger companies.
4. To rank against one another; bear comparison: We sent our critic out to see how the local restaurants stack up.
5. To make sense; add up: The story he gave the police was full of contradictions—it just didn't stack up.
6. To direct or cause some aircraft to circle at different altitudes while waiting to land: The control tower stacked up the planes until the runway could be cleared. The controllers stacked the planes up because only one runway was open.
See also: stack, up

stacked

mod. having to do with a person with a sexually attractive body, usually a female. I like to see stacked dames like that starting to do business in this place.