squirm

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squirm into (something)

To crawl, wriggle, or squeeze into some tight or confined thing or space. The dog likes to squirm into bed with me and my wife at night. I can squirm into the pants, but there's no way I'll be able to zip them up.
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squirm in

1. To crawl, wriggle, or squeeze into some tight or confined thing or space. The dog likes to jump up onto the bed and squirm in between me and my wife at night. These pants are too small for me now—I managed to squirm in, but there's no way I'll be able to zip them up.
2. To wriggle or fidget while seated in something, as due to nervousness or boredom. Stop squirming in your chair like that, it's really distracting! He squirmed in his seat throughout the entire interview.
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squirm with (something)

To wriggle or fidget as a result of something. I was squirming with the urgent need to go to the bathroom, not impatience! He sat squirmed with frustration throughout the entire presentation.
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squirm out (of something)

1. To crawl, wriggle, or squeeze to become freed from some narrow cramped, or confined place or thing. My daughter squirmed out of my arms when I tried to brush her hair. Once the cat saw that I wasn't going to hurt it, it squirmed out of its hiding place and crept toward me.
2. To disentangle oneself from some situation, duty, or responsibility, especially through sly, devious, or You've squirmed your way out of doing the dishes for the last time! Sally always finds some way to squirm out of any trouble she gets herself into.
3. To disentangle oneself from some situation, duty, or responsibility, especially through sly, devious, or cunning means. You've squirmed out of doing the dishes for the last time! Sally always finds some way to squirm out of any trouble she gets herself into. I told you that the whole company has to be there to do the inventory count—you're not squirming out this time!
See also: out, squirm

squirm in(to something)

to press into something that is tight; to crawl or wiggle into something tight. (For people, this is often clothing that is too tight. For other creatures, it is more variable.) Dave squirmed into his jeans and pledged to himself that he would lose some weight. He squirmed in and knew he could never close the zipper.
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squirm out

 (of something)
1. Lit. to crawl or wiggle out of something. The worm squirmed out of its hole and was gobbled up by a bird. The worm squirmed out.
2. Fig. to escape doing something; to escape the responsibility for having done something. He agreed to go but squirmed out at the last minute. You did it and you can't squirm out of it by denying it!
See also: out, squirm

squirm with something

to fidget or move around restlessly, showing irritation of some type. The children squirmed with impatience, but they kept quiet. I squirmed with discomfort, hoping that the time on the aircraft would pass rapidly.
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squirm out

v.
1. To extricate oneself by sly or subtle means from some situation; worm one's way out of some situation: She squirmed out of the promise she'd made without upsetting anyone. He was supposed to wash the dishes tonight, but somehow he squirmed out.
2. To free oneself from something by turning, twisting, or writhing the body: The fish squirmed out of my grasp. I put the snake in a bag, but it squirmed out.
See also: out, squirm
References in periodicals archive ?
Kevin's Supersized Salvage Channel 4, 9pm We have a lot of time for Kevin McCloud, not least because while he may be an uber successful TV presenter and designer, he's also an eco warrior who quite rightly squirms at the thought of all the valuable waste that is thrown away.
When a walnut stock squirms, both accuracy and the rifle's point of impact can be affected, and this was the inspiration for the synthetic stock so common today.
This is not only relatively expensive to do in mass production, but in a walnut-stocked rifle tends to create problems when the wood inevitably starts to squirm.
To our surprise, no one squirms uncomfortably when all partners (gay or straight) are encouraged to kiss for the camera, in keeping with bridge tradition.
Among them: "often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities," "is often easily distracted by extraneous stimuli," "often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat," and "often blurts out answers before questions have been completed." As Walker and DeGrandpre both note, parents are frequently surprised to learn that the clinical observation of these symptoms, over the span of a 10-minute doctor's consultation, is the sole basis of an ADHD diagnosis.
She who finds an ordinary compliment hard to swallow squirms under the burden of praise spilled by the typical Mother's Day homily.
OH, MAN: The ball squirms through his grasp and trickles towards goal in a re-run of his goof at Old Trafford
The next section presents examples of situational role plays that can make student teachers "squirm" with discomfort (situations that have many solutions, that can have disastrous outcomes if participants are not careful, and that can help participants make connections between theories of classroom management they have read about and discussed in class).