squirm

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squirm into (something)

To crawl, wriggle, or squeeze into some tight or confined thing or space. The dog likes to squirm into bed with me and my wife at night. I can squirm into the pants, but there's no way I'll be able to zip them up.
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squirm in

1. To crawl, wriggle, or squeeze into some tight or confined thing or space. The dog likes to jump up onto the bed and squirm in between me and my wife at night. These pants are too small for me now—I managed to squirm in, but there's no way I'll be able to zip them up.
2. To wriggle or fidget while seated in something, as due to nervousness or boredom. Stop squirming in your chair like that, it's really distracting! He squirmed in his seat throughout the entire interview.
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squirm with (something)

To wriggle or fidget as a result of something. I was squirming with the urgent need to go to the bathroom, not impatience! He sat squirmed with frustration throughout the entire presentation.
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squirm out (of something)

1. To crawl, wriggle, or squeeze to become freed from some narrow cramped, or confined place or thing. My daughter squirmed out of my arms when I tried to brush her hair. Once the cat saw that I wasn't going to hurt it, it squirmed out of its hiding place and crept toward me.
2. To disentangle oneself from some situation, duty, or responsibility, especially through sly, devious, or You've squirmed your way out of doing the dishes for the last time! Sally always finds some way to squirm out of any trouble she gets herself into.
3. To disentangle oneself from some situation, duty, or responsibility, especially through sly, devious, or cunning means. You've squirmed out of doing the dishes for the last time! Sally always finds some way to squirm out of any trouble she gets herself into. I told you that the whole company has to be there to do the inventory count—you're not squirming out this time!
See also: out, squirm

squirm in(to something)

to press into something that is tight; to crawl or wiggle into something tight. (For people, this is often clothing that is too tight. For other creatures, it is more variable.) Dave squirmed into his jeans and pledged to himself that he would lose some weight. He squirmed in and knew he could never close the zipper.
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squirm out

 (of something)
1. Lit. to crawl or wiggle out of something. The worm squirmed out of its hole and was gobbled up by a bird. The worm squirmed out.
2. Fig. to escape doing something; to escape the responsibility for having done something. He agreed to go but squirmed out at the last minute. You did it and you can't squirm out of it by denying it!
See also: out, squirm

squirm with something

to fidget or move around restlessly, showing irritation of some type. The children squirmed with impatience, but they kept quiet. I squirmed with discomfort, hoping that the time on the aircraft would pass rapidly.
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squirm out

v.
1. To extricate oneself by sly or subtle means from some situation; worm one's way out of some situation: She squirmed out of the promise she'd made without upsetting anyone. He was supposed to wash the dishes tonight, but somehow he squirmed out.
2. To free oneself from something by turning, twisting, or writhing the body: The fish squirmed out of my grasp. I put the snake in a bag, but it squirmed out.
See also: out, squirm
References in periodicals archive ?
One way to keep walnut squirming to a minimum it to glue layers of it together, as in plywood.
Noting actions such as "giggling," "squirming," and "blurting out" on a 35-category behavioral checklist, he found no significant behavioral differences.
From squirming in your seat and pacing while you think to running and weight lifting--moving burns calories.
Despite millions of dollars raised and spent, these subversives failed to capture the House of Representatives until 1994, when, thanks to President's Clinton's political ineptitude, they were able to shift enough of the flat rocks of the republic to provide the Republican Party with a truly weird, squirming majority of nonrepresentative (let us hope) representatives.
THREE mistakes left Portsmouth nailed to the floor of the First Division and new boss Alan Ball squirming in disbelief.
And it's great fun to read Tudge squirming around the question of whether present-day human beings are "superior" to their forebears.
Then, with us they held squirming Lily as water cascaded across her head.
These include constant fidgeting or squirming, difficulty maintaining attention and finishing projects, a volatile temper, and becoming frustrated easily.
The series is a joke, it's a bad joke and it is bad for the city's image and just as bad for the double glazing industry, who must be squirming over it.
That might sound like a long time to keep from squirming.
NEWCASTLE may have applauded Steve Bennett but his decision to overturn the sending-off of Jermaine Jenas (below) must have left refs all around the country squirming.
Whenever I tried to imagine any of my time-pressed, stressed-out friends in the seat beside me, I could only hear them sighing in impatient exasperation, or squirming in their seats, or nervously fidgeting with their fingers or their hair.
Some of Larson's images include a naturally moving element (trees outside a kitchen door, a squirming infant in a seated man's arms), but the central figures remain motionless: A woman stares at a newspaper in bed, a large dog at her feet; the artist is poised getting in (or out of) a bathtub.
Have you noticed the Wall street analysts who are squirming in their seats as it becomes obvious they sold their soul and recommended stocks to you and I that they knew were dogs?
Unbearably loud rock music, sequined jack straps, oleaginous squirming, and unintelligible verbiage were the fare in his 1993 repertory.