squirm in

squirm in

1. To crawl, wriggle, or squeeze into some tight or confined thing or space. The dog likes to jump up onto the bed and squirm in between me and my wife at night. These pants are too small for me now—I managed to squirm in, but there's no way I'll be able to zip them up.
2. To wriggle or fidget while seated in something, as due to nervousness or boredom. Stop squirming in your chair like that, it's really distracting! He squirmed in his seat throughout the entire interview.
See also: squirm

squirm in(to something)

to press into something that is tight; to crawl or wiggle into something tight. (For people, this is often clothing that is too tight. For other creatures, it is more variable.) Dave squirmed into his jeans and pledged to himself that he would lose some weight. He squirmed in and knew he could never close the zipper.
See also: squirm
References in periodicals archive ?
Still, there's no torture quite so juicy as watching someone squirm in Dame Edna's cross hairs.
Instead she has bared her soul and made her terrible secrets public so he should squirm in the full glare of publicity.
There are none of the long boring stretches that remind you of love scenes you saw in movies when you were a kid that made you squirm in your seat or run to the popcorn stand.
The NBA Most Valuable Player, the Lakers' driving force and the player who makes the rest of the league squirm in fear had just nine points over the first 36 minutes.