squint at (someone or something)

(redirected from squinting at)

squint at (someone or something)

To purse one's eyelids half-shut while looking at someone or something. If you squint at Sarah, you might just mistake her for her mother. I've been squinting at this fine print for nearly 10 minutes trying to read it all.
See also: squint

squint at someone or something

to look at someone or something with the eyes partly closed. (When squinting, the eyes are partly closed by pressing the upper and lower eyelids toward one another.) Why are you squinting at me? I had to squint at the small print in order to read it.
See also: squint
References in classic literature ?
"Does he boast of his successes?" asked Edna, indifferently, squinting at her picture.
'Every time I read up a card I just pucker up, just a little bit,' Harvey said, squinting at a card just handed out to him.
I dream in my chair he's young: walking towards me, squinting at
"Both English and Welsh speakers in modern Wales already spend significant amounts of time squinting at words wondering which language they're reading - tacsi?
The only person who spent "significant amounts of time squinting at words wondering which language they were reading" was Kingsley "Tacsi" Amis in the mid-1980s - and he got much better jokes out of it than Lanchester.
MANY UK school children would rather endure squinting at the whiteboard than being teased for wearing their specs, new research has revealed.
As I sat down to wait, everyone started squinting at me; you know how people with bad eyesight give you the once-over?
Squinting at a computer screen can cut in half the number of times someone blinks each minute--and that could lead to a condition called dry eye, suggests research from Ohio State University, Columbus.
One way to attract attention is to delve into a crowded briefcase (people can't resist squinting at someone else's belongings).
"I thought I was a bad typist," said Mole, squinting at the chart on the wall.
The design stops the wearer squinting at the sun - one of the main causes of wrinkles - according to the makers.
Lugo seemed surprised, squinting at the jury and his lawyer as the verdict was read out.