squint


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

squint like a bag of nails

To squint one's eyes severely. She definitely needs glasses—she's been squinting like a bag of nails all day.
See also: bag, like, nail, of, squint

squint at (someone or something)

To purse one's eyelids half-shut while looking at someone or something. If you squint at Sarah, you might just mistake her for her mother. I've been squinting at this fine print for nearly 10 minutes trying to read it all.
See also: squint

squint out (of) (something)

To purse one's eyelids half-shut while looking outward through an eye, opening, or apparatus. It was so steamy in the room that I spent the whole time squinting out of foggy glasses. She squinted out the window, trying to catch a glimpse of the movie star in the dazzling sunshine. My left eye is totally blind, so if I forget to wear my glasses, I have to squint out of my right eye to see anything at all.
See also: out, squint

squint at someone or something

to look at someone or something with the eyes partly closed. (When squinting, the eyes are partly closed by pressing the upper and lower eyelids toward one another.) Why are you squinting at me? I had to squint at the small print in order to read it.
See also: squint

squint out of something

 
1. to cast one's gaze from something, such as a place of concealment, with one's eyes partly closed. The prisoner squinted out of the little hatch in the door to his cell. You could see that many people were squinting out of the windows, trying to get a good view of the movie star who was visiting.
2. to cast one's gaze through something, such as glasses, one eye, etc., with one's eyes partly closed. she squinted out of one eye in the bright sun. Tony squinted out of his glasses and his mother decided that he needed to have his eyes checked again.
See also: of, out, squint
References in periodicals archive ?
He said remedy of the squint was possible through eye exercises.
He has lectured, researched and published extensively on his specialist areas of interest, including original clinical papers related to Children's Eye Diseases, Strabismus (Squints) and Cataract surgery.
Coolness is out of the question; he is inevitably nicknamed Squint.
He said squint, refractive errors, and low vision should be treated before the age of sixteen as it becomes complicated with the passage of time and it can result in blindness.
He informed that squint, refractive errors, and low vision should be treated before the age of sixteen as it became complicated with the passage of time which resulted in blindness.
I squint, even though I don't use glasses to read, I cannot drive,' said Emmanuel Dairo, a PLWA and Master's Degree Holder in the Department of English, University of Lagos.
The so-called 'squint angle' defines the aberration of the laser beam from the central axis of the housing.
The plot thickens when he unwittingly hires Long John as the ship's cook and Long John recruits the pirates who sailed with Squint as crew for the voyage.
The patient, Emma Quintin, a Dubai resident and UK national, with a family history of eye problems said she always had 'tired eyes' but no discomfort or impairment and no diagnosis of squint. This all changed after a road accident at the start of 2017.
Squint. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018.
If you squint toward the smoggy dawn above the Eight Mile,
Sophie's daughter Louise was born prematurely in 2003, causing a condition called strabismus which left her with what the countess described as a "profound" squint.
Yarm Primary School came top in the Key Stage Two section of The Times Educational Supplement (TES) competition, with their Daily Squint publication.
A childhood operation to correct a squint changed the life journey of Shirley Muir.
The benefits of electronic measurement for squint may be clear, but Dr Barnard highlighted other key areas in which the Eye Check can make, and has already made, an impact.