spun


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Related to spun: get spun
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homespun

Unpretentious and unsophisticated. Oh, I had a great time—it was a homespun event, very casual and friendly.

spin (one) a line

To tell a lie or only part of the truth in order to convince one of something or to avoid the consequences of something. Don't you dare spin me a line about being at the library. I want to know exactly where you were tonight.
See also: line, spin

spin (one) a story

To tell a lie or only part of the truth in order to convince one of something or to avoid the consequences of something. Don't you dare spin me a story about being at the library. I want to know exactly where you were tonight. I suspect he's just spinning a story about where all that money came from.
See also: spin, story

spin (one) a tale

To tell a lie or fictionalized version of the truth in order to convince someone of something or to avoid the consequences of something. Don't you dare spin me a tale about being at the library. I want to know exactly where you were tonight. I suspect he's just spinning a tale about where all that money came from.
See also: spin, tale

spin (one) a yarn

To tell a lie or only part of the truth in order to convince one of something or to avoid the consequences of something. Don't you dare spin me a yarn about being at the library. I want to know exactly where you were tonight. I suspect he's just spinning a yarn about where all that money came from.
See also: spin, yarn

spin (one's) wheels

To waste one's time or energy idly or frivolously; to neither progress nor regress, but remain in a fixed, neutral position. They kept me on to manage what's left of this division, but to be honest, I've just been spinning my wheels here for the last couple of years. We haven't been able to do anything new until more funding comes in, so the project is just spinning its wheels for the moment.
See also: spin, wheel

spin around

1. To turn rapidly around in the opposite direction. I spun around when I though I heard my name. The police car spun around and turned on its siren to begin pursuing the van that ran the red light.
2. To cause someone or something to turn rapidly around in the opposite direction. A noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "around." She had to spin the motorboat around and started heading back to shore. I had to spin the toddler around to keep him from walking down the steps.
3. To turn around in circles very rapidly. The child spun around and collapsed on the ground laughing from her dizziness. The car began spinning around in the parking lot, leaving circles of tire tracks on the pavement.
4. To cause someone or something to turn around in circles very rapidly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "around." I'll put this blindfold on you and spin you around, and then you try to hit the piñata with this stick. He spun the dial around until the tumblers of the lock clicked into place.
5. To visit some place for a brief period of time or for a particular purpose. I need to spin around the office to pick up some paperwork. Why don't you spin around on Saturday for dinner?
See also: around, spin

spin down

1. To decelerate (to some speed or state) while spinning. She shut off the power and the rotating cylinder spun down to a stop.
2. To travel (to some location) for a brief visit or a specific purpose. Almost always followed by "to." Why don't we spin down to the beach for the afternoon? I'm going to spin down to the mall to see if I can find anything to wear to Sarah's wedding.
3. To reduce the spin speed of a computer's hard disk drive. The computer automatically spins down the disk drive in order to conserve power when it no longer needs to read or write data.
4. To spin some solution in a centrifuge in order to separate it into its constituent components. A noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "down." The researchers then spin down the blood samples to isolate the plasma within them. Spinning the solution down is an effective way to extract insoluble materials from it.
See also: down, spin

spin in (one's) grave

To (hypothetically) show enormous anger, disfavor, or regret for someone's actions or something that happens after one has died. That is, if someone were still alive, they would be greatly upset, angered, or disgusted by what has happened. I can't believe you're using our employees' pension payments to prop up a Ponzi scheme. The founder of this once-great company would be spinning in his grave to see its directors stoop so low. Your poor mother would spin in her grave if she heard the horrible things you were saying about your sister. I can't believe you wrecked your grandfather's prized truck. That's enough to make him spin in his grave!
See also: grave, spin

spin off

1. verb To create or derive something from a larger or original thing. A noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "off." I heard they're spinning another show off from the political drama that will focus on the two main journalists and their relationship.
2. verb For a company to separate from one of its divisions or holdings through sale, reorganization, or other means. A noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "off." Only two years after purchasing it, the company has decided to spin off its VR division.
3. noun Something created or derived from a larger or original thing. As a noun, the phrase is usually hyphenated. Because it has become much more popular than the original, not many people know that this series is actually a spin-off.
See also: off, spin

spin on (one's) heels

To suddenly leave or depart. After walking in on an obviously private conversation, I spun on my heel and stepped right back out of the room. Several high-profile sponsors are spinning on their heels following the athlete's controversial statements.
See also: heel, on, spin

spin out

1. Of a car, to lose control and begin spinning. We spun out when we hit that patch of ice on the turn, but thankfully we didn't crash into anything.
2. To lengthen or draw out; to prolong. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "out." Why does the manager always spin these meetings out for such a long time? We've heard most of this already! The attorneys will try to spin out the appeals process for months if not years.
See also: out, spin

spin out of control

1. To spin or move around wildly or without the capacity of being controlled. After the second engine went dead, the plane started spinning out of control as it plummeted to the ground. She cranked the mechanical bull up to its maximum speed, and it started to spin out of control.
2. To continue getting worse, more erratic, or more unmanageable. With no job and a pile of debt, it just felt like my life was spinning out of control. You're the project manager—it's your job to make sure this project doesn't spin out of control.
See also: control, of, out, spin

spin round

1. To rotate. The Earth spins round on a vertical axis, which is what gives us our nights and days. The car began spinning round in the parking lot, leaving circles of tire tracks on the pavement.
2. To cause someone or something to turn around in circles. A noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "round." I'll put this blindfold on you and spin you round, and then you try to hit the piñata with this stick. He spun the dial round until the tumblers of the lock clicked into place.
3. To revolve (around something). The Earth spins round the Sun, which is what gives us our seasons.
4. To turn rapidly around to face the opposite direction. I spun round when I thought I heard my name. The police car spun round and began pursuing the van that ran the red light.
5. To cause someone or something to turn rapidly around in the opposite direction. A noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "around." She had to spin the motorboat round and start heading back to shore. I spun him round and marched him right back out of the house.
6. To visit some place for a brief period of time or for a particular purpose. I need to spin round to the office to pick up some paperwork. Why don't you spin round on Saturday to have dinner with me and Melissa?
See also: round, spin

spin up

1. To program or code a computer server, network, website, application, etc. A noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "up." We should spin up additional server nodes to deal with the increase in web traffic. He asked me to spin a new portal up for users to log in to the site.
2. To increase the spin speed of a computer's hard disk drive. The computer automatically spins up the disk drive when it needs to read or write data.
See also: spin, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

spin around

 
1. to turn around to face a different direction. Jill spun around to face her accuser. Todd spun around in his chair so he could see who was talking to him.
2. to rotate, possibly a number of times. The propellers spun around and soon the old plane began to taxi down the runway. The merry-go-round spun around at a moderate speed.
See also: around, spin

spin off

[for something] to part and fly away from something that is spinning; [for something] to detach or break loose from something. The blade of the lawn mower spun off, but fortunately no one was injured. The rusted-on nut spun off easily after I got it loosened.
See also: off, spin

spin out

[for a vehicle] to go out of control, spinning. You nearly spun out on that last turn! Cars were spinning out all over the highway when the ice storm hit.
See also: out, spin

spin something off

 
1. Lit. [for something rotating] to release a part that flies away. The propeller spun one of its blades off and then fell apart all together. It spun off one of its blades.
2. Fig. [for a business] to divest itself of one of its subparts. The large company spun one of its smaller divisions off. It spun off a subsidiary and used the cash to pay down its debt.
3. Fig. [for an enterprise] to produce useful or profitable side effects or products. We will be able to spin off a number of additional products. The development of this product will allow us to spin off dozens of smaller, innovative products for years to come.
See also: off, spin

spin something out

to prolong something. Was there really any need to spin the whole process out so long? Why did they spin out the graduation ceremony for such a long time?
See also: out, spin
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

spin off

Derive or produce from something else, especially a small part from a larger whole. For example, The corporation decided to spin off the automobile parts division, or Her column was spun off from her book on this subject. The expression transfers the throwing off by centrifugal force, as in spinning, to other enterprises. [Mid-1900s]
See also: off, spin

spin out

1. Protract or prolong, as in They spun out the negotiations over a period of months. This idiom alludes to drawing out a thread by spinning. [c. 1600]
2. Rotate out of control, as in The car spun out and crashed into the store window. [Mid-1900s]
See also: out, spin
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

spin off

v.
To derive something, such as a company or product, from some source: The television network decided to spin a new show off from its popular comedy series. The media conglomerate spun off its entertainment division.
See also: off, spin

spin out

v.
To rotate out of control, as a skidding car leaving a roadway: The car spun out on the ice and crashed into the ditch.
See also: out, spin
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

get spun

in. to get drunk. Let’s go out and get spun.
See also: get, spun

homespun

n. homemade liquor or beer. Jed offered a little of his homespun round the table.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Though British hand spinners spun home-grown flax, it constituted only a small part of the linen yarn used by British linen weavers.
Traditionally, the household's women spun the flax into linen yarn and the men wove it into cloth.
The total draw ratio was kept at a lower value because the drawability of dry-wet spun fiber was poorer.
The fibers spun from the pregelled solution possessed more circular cross-section than the fibers spun from the solution not aged.
SPUN SUPPORTS Electrospinning could have its biggest impact producing scaffolding for the emerging field of tissue engineering.
Spun into threads, natural dragline silk glistens in glorious golden tones.
Berg and his colleagues first "tethered" the tails of Escherichia colicells to a sapphire base, then spun the cell bodies around in two directions, at various speeds, with a rotating electric field.
Astrophysicists speculate that when it first formed 100 million years ago, the pulsar spun more slowly and its companion was a normal star much like the sun.
A basketball-like nucleus when spun, for example, will smear out into a shape looking something like a curling stone.