spoof

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phish

To attempt to steal personal information that can be used to defraud someone by pretending to be person or website that legitimately requires such information. We've gotten reports of someone phishing for our customer's login details recently. Remember, we will never ask you for your password under any circumstances, whether on the phone or by email. The group created a phony website meant to look like a popular online store in order to phish for people's credit card numbers.

spoofing

The practice of stealing, or attempting to steal, personal information over the phone or on the internet by pretending to be someone or something that legitimately requires such details. We've gotten reports of a number of spoofing attempts being made against our customers recently. Remember, we will never ask you for your password under any circumstances, whether on the phone or by email. The use of the so-called dark web makes the culprits behind these spoofing attacks nearly impossible to catch.
See also: spoof

spoofing attack

The practice of stealing, or attempting to steal, personal information over the phone or on the internet by pretending to be someone or something that legitimately requires such details. We've gotten reports of an increasing number of spoofing attacks being made against our customers recently. Remember, we will never ask you for your password under any circumstances, whether on the phone or by email. The use of the so-called dark web makes the culprits behind these spoofing attacks nearly impossible to catch.
See also: attack, spoof

spoof

1. noun A satirical imitation, mockery, or parody of someone or something. The film is a spoof of old film noirs from the 1940s and '50s. This pivotal scene in the play is meant to serve as a spoof on the maddening, nonsensical bureaucracy surrounding such legal issues.
2. verb To imitate, mock, or parody someone or something in such a satirical manner. It's clear the writer is spoofing the peculiar way in which the former president was known to speak. I always wanted to make a movie that spoofs the over-the-top action films from the '80s.
3. verb In information security, to masquerade as a particular person, device, program, etc., in order to gain illegitimate access to something, such as information or control over a network or system. Please be aware that hackers are spoofing email addresses from the bank in order to obtain customers' login credentials. Someone spoofed the IP address of a trusted device in order to deliver message across the company network containing malware.

phish

and spoof and card
in. to “fish” for passwords and personal information by trickery, on internet. (Sometimes by setting up a phony URL which people sign in to by giving their passwords or credit card numbers.) They must have been phishing to get my credit card number while I placed an order online.

spoof

verb
See phish

spoof

(spuf)
1. n. a parody. The first act was a spoof of a Congressional investigation.
2. tv. to make a parody of someone or something. The comedian spoofed the executive branch by sitting in a big chair and going to sleep.
3. Go to phish.

spoofing

and carding and phishing 1
n. stealing passwords and personal information on the internet. (see also phish for an explanation.) He set up an evil twin for spoofing at the coffee shop.
See also: spoof
References in periodicals archive ?
Fraudsters bombard consumers' phones at all hours of the day with spoofed robocalls, which in some cases lure consumers into scams (e.
The attacker with spoofed IP easily intrudes the cloud and triggers flooding at a high rate.
If the message is spoofed, the sending e-mail server will not show up as an approved sending addresses for that domain, and your e-mail authentication engine can automatically drop the offending e-mail.
Several stock Bollywood formulae were also spoofed, which was a prime reason of popularity of the film.
Calls with spoofed numbers can and do come from all over the world and account for a significant and growing proportion of nuisance calls made to consumers in English-speaking countries.