sponge


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sponge (something) off (of) (someone or something)

To beg for, borrow, or obtain something (usually money or food) as a handout from someone or something else. My brother's been sponging money off my parents ever since he dropped out of college. My roommate's nice, but she's always sponging food off of me, and I don't have the heart to tell her to stop.
See also: off, sponge

throw in the sponge

To give up on some endeavor; to quit or abandon something; to admit defeat or failure. I've been working on this book for over a year, and I'm getting nowhere with it. I think I'm ready to throw in the sponge. After trying their hand in the mobile market for just a few years, the company is already throwing in the sponge after finding very little success.
See also: sponge, throw

throw in the towel

To give up on some endeavor; to quit or abandon something; to admit defeat or failure. I've been working on this book for over a year, and I'm getting nowhere with it. I think I'm ready to throw in the towel. After trying their hand in the mobile market for just a few years, the company is already throwing in the towel after finding very little success.
See also: throw, towel

sponge down

1. To wash, wipe, or moisten with or as with a sponge. I didn't have time to shower, so I just sponged down before heading home.
2. To wash, wipe, or moisten someone or something with or as with a sponge. A noun or pronoun can be used between "sponge" and "down." There's a great photo of my parents sponging me down in the kitchen sink when I was a baby. Dad's making us sponge down the car because we drove it through the mud. The nurse sat by and sponged down the child's forehead to help keep the fever at bay.
See also: down, sponge

sponge on (someone or something)

To take advantage of someone else's generosity, charity, or hospitality in order to obtain something, typically money or food, as a handout. My brother's been sponging on my parents ever since he dropped out of college. I hated being on welfare—even though I really needed it, I always felt like I was sponging on the government
See also: on, sponge

sponge away

1. To clean (some surface) vigorously or continuously with a sponge. I sat there sponging away at the concrete until all the markings were removed.
2. To remove something by absorbing or wiping it with a sponge. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "sponge" and "away." Dad's out back sponging the graffiti away. The nurse sponged away the blood from the woman's shoulder.
See also: away, sponge

sponge from (someone or something)

1. To wipe, mop up, or otherwise clean away something from some surface with or as with a sponge. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "sponge" and "from." I sat beside her bed, sponging the sweat from her feverish brow. Dad's out back sponging the graffiti from the wall.
2. To obtain something, especially money or food, from another person, group, agency, country, etc., for free or without doing any work. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "sponge" and "from" to specify what is being obtained. The minute I had to go on social welfare, I felt like a bum who was sponging from the government. Tom's been sponging money from Mom and Dad for years. I don't know if he's ever held down a job for longer than a month at a time.
See also: sponge

sponge up

To absorb or mop up some liquid with or as with a sponge. A noun or pronoun is used between "sponge" and "up." One of the worst jobs in the hospital is sponging up all the blood and other bodily gunk that ends up on the floors after surgeries and deliveries. You need to sponge that paint up straight away—if it gets dry, you'll never get it off the floor.
See also: sponge, up

sponge someone or something down

to remove the [excess] moisture from someone or something; to wipe someone or something with a sponge. The fight manager sponged his boxer down. I will sponge down the countertop.
See also: down, sponge

sponge something away

to absorb, wipe up, and wipe away something, as with a sponge. Try sponging the stain away with some soda water. I will sponge away the mess.
See also: away, sponge

sponge something from someone

to beg or borrow money or food from someone. Gary tried to sponge a few bucks from me. I can't continue sponging food from my relatives.
See also: sponge

sponge something from something

to remove moisture from something, as with a sponge. Liz sponged the sauce from her blouse. We gently sponged the splattered paint from the carpet.
See also: sponge

sponge something off of someone or something

 and sponge something off
to beg or borrow money or food from someone or a group. Please stop sponging food and money off your relatives! Stop sponging off food and money all the time!
See also: of, off, sponge

sponge something up

to absorb or take up moisture, as with a sponge. I had to sponge the spilled milk up from the floor, the chair, the table, and the baby. What a mess! Liz sponged up the water.
See also: sponge, up

throw in the towel

 and throw in the sponge; toss in the sponge
Fig. (From boxing, where this is done by a boxer's trainer to stop the fight.) to signal that one is going to quit; to quit. When John could stand no more of Mary's bad temper, he threw in the towel and left. Don't give up now! It's too soon to throw in the sponge.
See also: throw, towel

sponge on

Also, sponge off. Impose on another's hospitality or generosity, as in He's been sponging on relatives for the past year. This expression uses sponge in the sense of "to soak up something." [Late 1600s]
See also: on, sponge

throw in the sponge

Also, throw in the towel. Give up, acknowledge defeat, as in I can't move this rock; I'm throwing in the sponge, or Bill decided to throw in the towel and resign from his job. This idiom comes from boxing, where formerly a fighter (or his second) conceded defeat by throwing the sponge or towel used to wipe his face into the ring. [c. 1900]
See also: sponge, throw

throw in the towel

COMMON If you throw in the towel, you stop trying to do something, because you know that you cannot succeed. Klara's support, when even her son's trainers wanted to throw in the towel, was crucial. Note: Verbs such as chuck and toss are sometimes used instead of throw. One day I will be brave enough (or fed up enough) to chuck in the towel and start again. Note: You can also say that someone throws in the sponge. You're not the kind of man who throws in the sponge. You're a fighter and it's your fighting spirit which is going to save you. Note: In boxing, a fighter's trainer sometimes throws a towel or sponge into the ring as a signal of defeat in order to stop the fight before there are any more injuries.
See also: throw, towel

throw in the towel (or sponge)

abandon a struggle; admit defeat.
Boxers or their trainers traditionally signal defeat by throwing the towel or sponge used to wipe a contestant's face into the middle of the ring.
See also: throw, towel

throw in the ˈtowel/ˈsponge

(informal) stop doing something because you know that you cannot succeed; admit defeat: It’s a bit early to throw in the towel — you’ve only just started the job.
This idiom comes from boxing: throwing in the towel or sponge is a sign that a fighter accepts defeat.
See also: sponge, throw, towel

sponge down

v.
To moisten or wipe the surface of someone or something with or as if with a sponge: The artist sponged down the canvas with primer before starting the painting. I had a high fever, so the nurse sponged my forehead down.
See also: down, sponge

sponge off

v.
1. To wipe or clean the surface of someone or something with or as if with a sponge: After dinner, I cleared all the dishes and sponged off the table. The blackboard was very dirty, so the teacher told me to sponge it off.
2. To live by relying on the generosity of someone else: He sponged off his parents for years because they never insisted that he get a job.
See also: off, sponge

sponge

and spunge
1. in. to drink heavily. She was sponging like there was no tomorrow.
2. n. a drunkard; a tippler. (see also blotter.) She was a spunge, and she wasn’t going to do anything about it.
3. n. a parasitic person. Here comes that sponge, Willy. Hide your wallet, pencils, glasses, and any clothes in his size.

sponge off someone

in. to live off someone; to take advantage of someone by taking food and shelter from them without compensation. Go get a job! Stop sponging off me!
See also: off, someone, sponge

sponged

mod. thirsty. I gotta get a drink, man. I’m sponged!
See also: sponge

throw in the towel

and throw in the sponge and toss in the sponge
tv. to quit; to give up. (From boxing, where a towel or sponge thrown into the ring indicates that a boxer has given up.) The candidate who was exposed by the press as a former pickpocket tossed in the sponge in a tearful press conference. I’m done! I’m tossing in the sponge!
See also: throw, towel

throw in the sponge

verb
See also: sponge, throw

toss in the sponge

verb
See also: sponge, toss

throw in the sponge/towel, to

To acknowledge defeat; to give up. J. C. Hotten’s Slang Dictionary of 1860 explained that this term comes from prizefighting, where throwing up the sponge used to clean the contender’s face was a signal that the “mill,” or round, was concluded. However, Hotten got it wrong; the sponge (or later, towel) more often was thrown up as a signal of defeat, and it is in this sense that the expression was transferred to other enterprises. “If ever you are tempted to say . . . ‘I am beaten and I throw up the sponge,’ remember Paul’s wise exhortation,” wrote Alexander Maclaren (Philippians, 1909). Later up was changed to in, at least in North America.
See also: sponge, throw

throw in the towel

To quit. A prizefighter's sidemen use sponges to clean his face of sweat and blood. To toss the sponge into the ring during a fight signaled that the boxer had had enough—and so the sponge was no longer needed. In recent years, towels have been substituted for sponges in boxing matches, and consequently, in the expression too.
See also: throw, towel
References in periodicals archive ?
If the substrate is irregular or covered densely with different sessile organisms, the sponge stolons are lengthy, with fewer branches (Fig.
In order to conduct the study, researchers used a method called DNA pyrosequencing to sequence the DNA of 28 samples of bacteria collected from 14 different kitchen sponges taken from private households in Baden-WAaAaAeA rttemberg, German
During surgery, in the cases which were diagnosed as intestinal obstruction [4 cases], the retained sponge was found between intestinal loops covered by fibrous tissues and causing dense adhesions between the bowel loops.
A systemic review of the PubMed and Google Scholar, and we found the smallest of the cases transmural migration of surgical sponges following abdominal surgery.
Locally grown loofah sponges are inexpensive but their popularity has waned over other varieties of sponges imported from Egypt.
My personal issue was that I did not wet the sponge at all.
where [E.sub.ad] is the percentage water adsorption of chitosan-gelatin sponge at equilibrium.
Little has been reported about the occurrence of freshwater sponges in Nebraska and no publications have previously recorded from central Nebraska waters.
In total 132 different types of sea sponge were found in Welsh waters during the project which ended in June.
Gibbs explains No Thing Left Behind[R] works to design ways to help hospitals--and surgeons, nurses and radiologists--"get this right." It has developed practices, including its own manual sponge management system called Sponge ACCOUNTing, and provides other practice and technological recommendations to help hospitals achieve zero retained items.
Fact.MR has announced the addition of the "Menstrual Sponge Market Forecast, Trend Analysis & Competition Tracking - Global Review 2018 to 2027"report to their offering.
Release date- 02092019 - Digital learning provider Sponge - the LPI's Learning Provider of the Year 2019 - will be highlighting the benefits of using play and creativity to engage learners at Learning Live, 133 Houndsditch, London on 4-5 September 2019.
Summary: Fact.MR has announced the addition of the "Menstrual Sponge Market Forecast, Trend Analysis & Competition Tracking - Global Review 2018 to 2027"report to their offering.
Unbeknownst to all, a kitchen sponge harbors more than 300 types of bacteria and germs, making it a notorious and silent disease-causing household tool.
Some of them admitted to eating bits of the sponges too, even taking a liking to the green scourer part of a cleaning sponge.