speak (one's) piece

(redirected from spoken piece)

speak (one's) piece

To share one's views or opinions out loud. Look, just give me five minutes to speak my piece, and then I'll leave you alone. You had your chance to speak your piece—now it's Sarah's turn.
See also: piece, speak
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

speak one's piece

Also, say one's piece. Say what one thinks, or what one usually says or is expected to say. For example, All right, you've spoken your piece; now let someone else have a turn. The piece in this expression alludes to a memorized poem or speech of the kind recited in a classroom. [Mid-1900s]
See also: piece, speak
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
The title track, a spoken piece, concerns "the brave pretence" that makes us conceal suffering, and implicitly announces this album's quest for a non-toxic masculinity.
As always, they are lightly edited by each author to help them move from a spoken piece to a written piece.
Year six pupils started the week off with an assembly where they performed a spoken piece called "all different, all equal".
As the journal has in the past, we reproduce here the three plenaries from the 2015 CWPA Conference hosted in Boise, Idaho; they are lightly edited by each author to help them move from a spoken piece to a written piece.
Eventually Chrissie piped up, 'What do you see, doctor?' 'Well, your piles are no better,' the doctor said, 'but I see an encounter with a tall dark stranger and a possible trip abroad '" If I were to turn this from a written to a spoken piece, I would first shorten it, secondly turn it into a personalised tale, thirdly use repetition words to improve the rhythm of the piece and then look at gestures to make it more comical.
Steve encourages entries ranging from stand-up and spoken pieces to sketches and musical comedy which must be suitable for 6pm audiences which is the time the programmes will air.
"SoulCry!" follows the story of Meena, the woman from India Scott-Conforti read about, and also places the subject in a broader context through dance sequences, narration, spoken pieces, music and multimedia on a big screen behind the dancers.