split

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make like a banana and split

humorous slang To depart or leave, especially at once or in a hurry. (A pun on "to split," a slang term meaning to leave or depart, and a "banana split," an ice-cream-based dessert featuring a banana halved lengthwise.) This carnival turned out to be really boring. Come on, let's make like a banana and split! A: "Where are Jeff and Sally?" B: "They needed to get home to feed the baby, so they made like a banana and split."
See also: and, banana, like, make, split

divide fifty-fifty

To split something evenly between both parties. I promised the kids that I would divide the last cookie fifty-fifty. Because you helped me so much with the yard sale, I want to divide the profits fifty-fifty.
See also: divide

lickety-split

Very quickly or efficiently. Wow, you really got those reports done lickety-split. Don't worry, we'll be in and out lickety-split.

split (one's) sides

To laugh uproariously or hysterically. Your jokes are perfect for your speech tonight. You'll have them splitting their sides!
See also: side, split

divide something fifty-fifty

 and split something fifty-fifty
to divide something into two equal parts. (The fifty means 50 percent.) Tommy and Billy divided the candy fifty-fifty. The robbers split the money fifty-fifty.
See also: divide

(It's) time to run.

 and (It's) time to move along.; (It's) time to push along.; (It's) time to push off.; (It's) time to split.
Inf. an announcement of one's desire or need to depart. (See also (I) have to shove off and (It's) time to hit the road for an illustration of other possible variations.) Andy: Time to push off. I've got to get home. Henry: See you, dude. John: It's time to split. I've got to go. Sue: Okay. See you tomorrow.
See also: run, time

(I've) got to split.

Inf. Fig. I have to leave now. (See also (I) have to shove off for other possible variations.) Jane: Look at the time! Got to split. Mary: See you later, Jane. Bill: It's getting late. I've got to split. Sue: Okay, see you tomorrow. Bill: Good night.
See also: split

split a gut

 and bust a gut 
1. Fig. Inf. to laugh very hard. He laughed until he nearly split a gut. The clown made me bust a gut laughing.
2. Fig. Inf. to work very hard. I split a gut to get this place fixed up in a week. Don't bust a gut cleaning up for me. I love things that are a bit messy.
See also: gut, split

split hairs

Fig. to quibble; to try to make petty distinctions. They don't have any serious differences. They are just splitting hairs. Don't waste time splitting hairs. Accept it the way it is.
See also: hair, split

split in something

to divide into a certain number of groups. (The something can be half, thirds, two, quarters, etc.) Lightning struck the big tree and the trunk split in half. The vase dropped and split in quarters.
See also: split

split off (from something)

to separate away from something; to sever connection with and separate from something. A large iceberg split off from the glacier and made an enormous splash. A giant chunk of ice split off and floated away.
See also: off, split

split one's sides (with laughter)

Fig. to laugh so hard that one's sides almost split. (Always an exaggeration.) The members of the audience almost split their sides with laughter. When I heard what happened to Patricia, I almost split my sides.
See also: side, split

split people up

to separate two or more people (from one another). If you two don't stop chattering, I'll have to split you up. I will have to split up that twosome in the corner.
See also: people, split, up

*split second

an instant; a tiny period of time. (*Typically: for ~; in ~.) The lightning struck, and in a split second the house burst into flames. For a split second, it looked like she would fall.
See also: second, split

split someone or something up (into something)

to divide people or things up into something, such as groups. I had to split the group up into two sectionsthere were so many who showed up. I split up the class into two discussion sections.
See also: split, up

split someone or something with someone or something

to divide someone or something with someone or a group of people. I will split the campers with you. You lead your half on the hike, and I will lead my half. Will you split your candy bar with me?
See also: split

split something between (someone and someone else)

 and split something between (something and something else)
to divide something between two people or things. The cook split the last of the pie between Jane and Carla. We have to split the copies of the reports between the two committees.
See also: split

split something into something

to divide or sever something into something. Jeff split the log into four parts. Please split this log in half so it will burn better.
See also: split

split something off (of) something

 and split something off
to sever connection with something; to separate from something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Dave split a piece of wood off the log to use for kindling. He split off a stick of wood.
See also: off, split

split the difference

to divide the difference evenly (with someone else). You want to sell for $120, and I want to buy for $100. Let's split the difference and close the deal at $110. I don't want to split the difference. I want $120.
See also: difference, split

split up (with someone)

[for someone] to separate from someone; to break up a marriage or love affair. Jeff split up with Judy. I had heard that they had split up with each other.
See also: split, up

vote a split ticket

Fig. to cast a ballot on which one's votes are divided between two or more parties. I always vote a split ticket since I detest both parties. Mary voted a split ticket for the first time in her life.
See also: split, ticket, vote

split hairs

Make trivial distinctions, quibble, as in Let's not split hairs about whose turn it is; I'll close up today and you do it tomorrow. This metaphoric idiom transfers dividing so fine an object as a single hair to other petty divisions. [Second half of 1600s]
See also: hair, split

split one's sides

Also, laugh one's head off. Be extremely amused, laugh uproariously. For example, That comedian had us splitting our sides, or Jane laughed her head off when she saw Rob's costume. The first of these hyperbolic terms dates from about 1700.
See also: side, split

split second

An instant, a fraction of a second, as in Our best swimmer came in a split second before theirs. This expression alludes to a stop watch that has two second hands, one above the other, for timing more than one athlete or intervals of a race by a single athlete. Each hand can be stopped independently of the other, so a second can be "split" when one second hand stops a fraction of a second after the other. [c. 1880]
See also: second, split

split the difference

Compromise between two close figures, divide the remainder equally. For example, You're asking $5,000 for the car and I'm offering $4,000; let's split the difference and make it $4,500 . [c. 1700]
See also: difference, split

split ticket

A ballot cast for candidates of more than one party, as in I'm registered as an Independent, and indeed I usually vote a split ticket. This idiom uses ticket in the sense of "a list of nominees for office," a usage dating from the late 1700s. Also see straight ticket.
See also: split, ticket

split hairs

If someone splits hairs, they argue about very small details or find very small differences between things which are really very similar. More than half the cases they complained about were not, in fact, on Garzon's list, but let's not split hairs. Don't split hairs. You know what I'm getting at. Note: You can also accuse someone of hair-splitting. We were becoming impatient with hair-splitting over legal technicalities.
See also: hair, split

split off

v.
1. To separate something; detach something: The babysitter split off a piece of fruit and shared it with the child. Before putting the flowers in water, I split the stem ends off.
2. To become separated from something: The political party split off from a broader coalition. As the temperature rose, a large section of the iceberg split off.
See also: off, split

split up

v.
1. To separate someone or something, such as people or groups; disunite someone or something: Artistic differences split up the band. They've been together too long to let a little argument split them up.
2. To become divided or part company as a result of discord or disagreement: My parents split up after 20 years of marriage.
3. To divide something, as for convenience or proper ordering: They split up the remainder of the money among themselves and parted ways. We split the project up into stages.
4. To become divided or be divisible: Let's split up into teams. This poem doesn't split up into stanzas very well.
See also: split, up

I’ve got to split

sent. I have to leave now. I’ve got to split. Call my service.
See also: split

lickety-split

(lɪkɪdiˈsplɪt)
mod. very fast. They ran across the field lickety-split.

split

in. to leave. Look at the clock. Time to split.

split a gut

1. tv. to laugh very hard. He laughed until he nearly split a gut.
2. tv. to work very hard. Don’t split a gut for me. I love things that are falling apart.
See also: gut, split

split up

1. in. to separate. The two split up and went their separate ways.
2. n. an act of separating or breaking up. (Usually split-up.) Everyone was mentally prepared for the company’s split-up.
See also: split, up

split hairs

To see or make trivial distinctions; quibble.
See also: hair, split

split one's sides

To laugh heartily.
See also: side, split

split the difference

To take half of a disputed amount as a compromise.
See also: difference, split
References in periodicals archive ?
Partnership interbranch payment splitter arrangements: An allocation of foreign income tax paid or accrued by a partnership with respect to an interbranch payment described in Regs.
Figure 4 shows the characterization of POF splitters that have been made by machine and hand.
The splitter is slated for operation in second-half 2016.
The inventor of the Table Log Splitter now seeks a third party licensee to manufacture, market, and distribute the product for her under a royalty agreement.
com ) announced it is now shipping its new Core Function Products (CFP) series Active L-band Splitters, the DEV 2161 and DEV 2162.
Amphenol's new splitter receives power and signal from one cable and splits it into two equal, yet separate, sets of power and signal as output, saving money and space while allowing additional functionality.
The inventor of the Cigarillo Perforator Splitter has developed a working prototype that has been utilized with success.
This dual central office splitter module is the first of its kind in our product range and to the market globally," said Ronan Kelly, product marketing engineer for Pulse Electronics.
The VOPEX[R] HDMI Video Splitter enables up to 16 HDMI displays to be driven by a single HDMI source with no loss of signal.
The splitter is owned by QP (51%), Total (10%), ExxonMobil (10%) and Cosmo Oil and Idemitsu of Japan (10% each), and Mitsui & Co.
SAN DIEGO -- Pulse, a Technitrol Company (NYSE:TNL), a worldwide leader in electronic component and subassembly design and manufacturing, announces that its new SmartER[TM] B8887NL central office (CO) splitter module, at just 8mm high, is the lowest profile splitter module available on the market today.
23, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Summary 2014 Market Research Report on Global PLC Splitter Industry is a professional and depth research report on Global PLC Splitter industry.
com)-- If you're looking for a way to deliver HD video and audio from a single source to 2 mirrored displays, an HDMI splitter is the right product for you.
The beam splitter intercepts light scattered back toward the slide and redirects it to a detector, where the researchers find a reasonably faithful image of the object originally depicted on the slide.
Pulse has implemented a complete test set-up for TR-127 to ensure that its products are fully in compliance with the new standard and has verified that its SmartER ADSL/VDSL splitter modules are fully compliant with the TR-127 standard for VDSL2 applications.