split (one's) ticket

(redirected from split their ticket)

split (one's) ticket

To vote for candidates from more than one political party for different roles in public office. It has become increasingly uncommon for voters to split their ticket by voting for candidates from both parties.
See also: split, ticket

split ticket

A ballot cast for candidates of more than one party, as in I'm registered as an Independent, and indeed I usually vote a split ticket. This idiom uses ticket in the sense of "a list of nominees for office," a usage dating from the late 1700s. Also see straight ticket.
See also: split, ticket
References in periodicals archive ?
Substantial numbers of voters split their ticket even in districts where candidates of the same party are elected.
In other words, if motivated to balance extreme positions, then Bush voters would be more likely to split their ticket for a liberal than a conservative Democratic House candidate.
In a wide-ranging interview about the race - the only competitive congressional contest this November in Texas - Gallego said he has been running into people whom he thinks will split their ticket, voting for Trump over Democratic rival Hillary Clinton but Gallego over Hurd.
Neerman said the strategy for the Dallas GOP is not to try to get Southern Dallas straight-ticket voters to split their ticket, which he called an impenetrable "fortress," but to recruit new voters who are independent or lean Republican.
And many voters said they regularly split their tickets, particularly when it comes to local races.
does not have party-line elections, so voters can either punish a party (usually the one that has been in charge) by voting against all of its candidates; fully support a particular party; or split their tickets by voting for one party's presidential candidate and another party's congressional candidates.
Senate race stood at a dead heat for several months, another aspect showed Barack Obama holding a 55-39 lead over Mitt Romney, suggesting that Brown will have to work on getting voters to split their tickets for him to win this fall.
Garand and Lichtl provide nuanced support for the proposition that at least some voters consciously split their tickets with the intent of electing a divided government.
But the precinct results also show how many Lane County voters didn't stick to the party line, and instead split their tickets.
Exit polls aren't available for 2002, but a look at the precinct results makes it clear that some of these conservative voters must have even split their tickets, casting a vote for Napolitano while also backing the extremely conservative congressional candidate.
An unnoticed against-the-tide group might, for example, some day enter a primary election, striving to nominate a candidate who won't make them want to split their tickets.
The notion that Texas Republicans will split their tickets in November more than usual has something of an ally in House Speaker Joe Straus.
In elections in the early 19th century, various members of the electoral college did indeed choose to split their tickets.
Since Republicans started winning statewide elections in 1978, voters have split their tickets three times, putting a Republican in the top seat and a Democrat in the second.
She says White's presence on the ballot breaks up straight-ticket voting - the idea being that people who would otherwise pull the Republican lever will instead vote for White and continue to split their tickets as they go down the ballot.