spinning


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spin (one) a line

To tell a lie or only part of the truth in order to convince one of something or to avoid the consequences of something. Don't you dare spin me a line about being at the library. I want to know exactly where you were tonight.
See also: line, spin

spin in (one's) grave

To (hypothetically) show enormous anger, disfavor, or regret for someone's actions or something that happens after one has died. That is, if someone were still alive, he or she would be greatly upset, angered, or disgusted by what has happened. I can't believe you're using our employees' pension payments to prop up a Ponzi scheme. The founder of this once-great company would be spinning in his grave to see its directors stoop so low. Your poor mother would spin in her grave if she heard the horrible things you were saying about your sister. I can't believe you wrecked your grandfather's prized truck. That's enough to make him spin in his grave!
See also: grave, spin

spin off

1. verb To create or derive something from a larger or original thing. A noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "off." I heard they're spinning another show off from the political drama that will focus on the two main journalists and their relationship.
2. verb For a company to separate from one of its divisions or holdings through sale, reorganization, or other means. A noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "off." Only two years after purchasing it, the company has decided to spin off its VR division.
3. noun Something created or derived from a larger or original thing. As a noun, the phrase is usually hyphenated. Because it has become much more popular than the original, not many people know that this series is actually a spin-off.
See also: off, spin

spin out

1. Of a car, to lose control and begin spinning. We spun out when we hit that patch of ice on the turn, but thankfully we didn't crash into anything.
2. To lengthen or draw out; to prolong. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "out." Why does the manager always spin these meetings out for such a long time? We've heard most of this already! The attorneys will try to spin out the appeals process for months if not years.
See also: out, spin

spin (one's) wheels

To waste one's time or energy idly or frivolously; to neither progress nor regress, but remain in a fixed, neutral position. They kept me on to manage what's left of this division, but to be honest, I've just been spinning my wheels here for the last couple of years. We haven't been able to do anything new until more funding comes in, so the project is just spinning its wheels for the moment.
See also: spin, wheel

have (an amount of) plates spinning

To ensure that a number of different activities are progressing as they should; to deal with or oversee a several different things at once. Rather than focusing on a single project, Tara prefers to have a number of plates spinning at once. I'm not surprised he's so burnt out—he had way too many plates spinning at the same time. You can't have all these plates spinning by yourself and expect to stay successful for long; you need to delegate some of these tasks to lower management.
See also: amount, have, plate, spinning

keep (an amount of) plates spinning

To ensure that a number of different activities are progressing as they should; to deal with or oversee a several different things at once. Rather than focusing on a single project, Tara prefers to keep a number of plates spinning at once. I'm not surprised he's so burnt out—he was keeping way too many plates spinning at the same time. You can't keep all these plates spinning by yourself and expect to stay successful for long; you need to delegate some of these tasks to lower management.
See also: amount, keep, plate, spinning

spin (one) a yarn

To tell a lie or only part of the truth in order to convince someone of something or to avoid the consequences of something. Don't you dare spin me a yarn about being at the library. I want to know exactly where you were tonight. I suspect he's just spinning a yarn about where all that money came from.
See also: spin, yarn

spin (one) a story

To tell a lie or only part of the truth in order to convince someone of something or to avoid the consequences of something. Don't you dare spin me a story about being at the library. I want to know exactly where you were tonight. I suspect he's just spinning a story about where all that money came from.
See also: spin, story

spin on (one's) heels

To suddenly leave or depart. After walking in on an obviously private conversation, I spun on my heel and stepped right back out of the room. Several high-profile sponsors are spinning on their heels following the athlete's controversial statements.
See also: heel, on, spin

spin (one) a tale

To tell a lie or fictionalized version of the truth in order to convince someone of something or to avoid the consequences of something. Don't you dare spin me a tale about being at the library. I want to know exactly where you were tonight. I suspect he's just spinning a tale about where all that money came from.
See also: spin, tale

spin around

1. To turn rapidly around in the opposite direction. I spun around when I though I heard my name. The police car spun around and turned on its siren to begin pursuing the van that ran the red light.
2. To cause someone or something to turn rapidly around in the opposite direction. A noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "around." She had to spin the motorboat around and started heading back to shore. I had to spin the toddler around to keep him from walking down the steps.
3. To turn around in circles very rapidly. The child spun around and collapsed on the ground laughing from her dizziness. The car began spinning around in the parking lot, leaving circles of tire tracks on the pavement.
4. To cause someone or something to turn around in circles very rapidly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "around." I'll put this blindfold on you and spin you around, and then you try to hit the piñata with this stick. He spun the dial around until the tumblers of the lock clicked into place.
5. To visit some place for a brief period of time or for a particular purpose. I need to spin around the office to pick up some paperwork. Why don't you spin around on Saturday for dinner?
See also: around, spin

spin around

 
1. to turn around to face a different direction. Jill spun around to face her accuser. Todd spun around in his chair so he could see who was talking to him.
2. to rotate, possibly a number of times. The propellers spun around and soon the old plane began to taxi down the runway. The merry-go-round spun around at a moderate speed.
See also: around, spin

spin off

[for something] to part and fly away from something that is spinning; [for something] to detach or break loose from something. The blade of the lawn mower spun off, but fortunately no one was injured. The rusted-on nut spun off easily after I got it loosened.
See also: off, spin

spin out

[for a vehicle] to go out of control, spinning. You nearly spun out on that last turn! Cars were spinning out all over the highway when the ice storm hit.
See also: out, spin

spin something off

 
1. Lit. [for something rotating] to release a part that flies away. The propeller spun one of its blades off and then fell apart all together. It spun off one of its blades.
2. Fig. [for a business] to divest itself of one of its subparts. The large company spun one of its smaller divisions off. It spun off a subsidiary and used the cash to pay down its debt.
3. Fig. [for an enterprise] to produce useful or profitable side effects or products. We will be able to spin off a number of additional products. The development of this product will allow us to spin off dozens of smaller, innovative products for years to come.
See also: off, spin

spin something out

to prolong something. Was there really any need to spin the whole process out so long? Why did they spin out the graduation ceremony for such a long time?
See also: out, spin

spin off

Derive or produce from something else, especially a small part from a larger whole. For example, The corporation decided to spin off the automobile parts division, or Her column was spun off from her book on this subject. The expression transfers the throwing off by centrifugal force, as in spinning, to other enterprises. [Mid-1900s]
See also: off, spin

spin out

1. Protract or prolong, as in They spun out the negotiations over a period of months. This idiom alludes to drawing out a thread by spinning. [c. 1600]
2. Rotate out of control, as in The car spun out and crashed into the store window. [Mid-1900s]
See also: out, spin

keep all the plates spinning

If you keep all the plates spinning you deal successfully with several things at once. I like doing different things, keeping all the plates spinning at the same time. Note: This expression is used in many other structures connected with managing to do several things at once. He already has enough plates spinning — consultancies, newspaper columns, not to mention four restaurants — to keep him in London. When you have to keep as many plates spinning as she does, you know something is sometimes going to crash. Note: This expression comes from the idea of the circus act where a large number of plates are kept spinning on tall sticks.
See also: all, keep, plate, spinning

spin off

v.
To derive something, such as a company or product, from some source: The television network decided to spin a new show off from its popular comedy series. The media conglomerate spun off its entertainment division.
See also: off, spin

spin out

v.
To rotate out of control, as a skidding car leaving a roadway: The car spun out on the ice and crashed into the ditch.
See also: out, spin
References in periodicals archive ?
The guidelines for the customer spinning trials are regulated according to ISO 9000/9001.
5 : to feel as if in a whirl <My head was spinning.
The X-ray power could be a sign that magnetic fields extend outward from the hole and thread around the spinning accretion disk.
On the other hand, Ring Spinning Systems have been refined during the last 30 years, the ultimate objectives of spinning dialectologists are focussed on higher production speed, combined with adequate quality.
Recently she has taken that hobby to school with her, engaging her students in raising the worms, then spinning and weaving the silk into bracelets.
6) (The process for the machine spinning of medium and fine linen yams was developed several decades later.
Wood-N-Ewe, a store dedicated to spinning and weaving, holds a spin-in once a month for those who want to perfect their skill at turning wool to yarn the old-fashioned way.
She adds Spinning to her weekly routine of step aerobics, water aerobics, weights and time on the power treadmill.
Manufacturers have redistributed the weight across the disks and have practically banned friction between the yo-yo's spinning axle and the string.
Between the perfectly spinning toss and the flat toss lies a continuum of other possibilities, in which the coin spins around a tilted axis, precessing like an old-fashioned children's top.
Something like the spinning of a top, spin gives the electron magnetic properties, such as those of an infinitesimally small bar magnet, but with strange quantum properties.
The theory could also explain why slow-spinning pulsars are commonly found to have partners while many older, more rapidly spinning pulsars do not.
Depending on their mood or style preference, customers can opt to have spinning or non-spinning wheels with a few simple steps.
Protons and neutrons have a quantum mechanical property, known as spin, that's analogous to the angular momentum of a spinning top.
The following is a list of stations currently spinning "BIG" - KIXZ, Spokane, WA; KKJG, San Luis Obispo, CA; WTCR, Huntington.