spew out

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spew out

1. To gush out suddenly and with great force or volume. Sewage started spewing out after we struck the pipe with our shovels. I turned around just as vomited spewed out of his mouth.
2. To cause something to gush or discharge out suddenly and with great force or volume. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "spew" and "out." The hose spewed out a vile green muck when I turned on the tap. I got so drunk that I ended up spewing my dinner out onto the bar.
3. To say something in a very aggressive, forceful, or vitriolic manner. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "spew" and "out." The group of protestors continued to spew obscenities out at us as we made our way to the car. By the end of the debate, my opponent was reduced to spewing out absurd, unprovable accusations.
See also: out, spew

spew something out

to have something gush forth. The faucet spewed a little yellowish water out and stopped altogether. The faucet spewed out some yellowish water.
See also: out, spew
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been found that Comet Hartley 2 spews out more material than a comet just under a mile wide is expected to, space.com has reported.
VOLATILE: Ubinas in Peru spews out toxic fumes yesterday' UDDER MADNESS: Masked calf in Peru's Moquegua region
The printer spews out fruit- or vegetable-based ink instead of normal ink, which is toxic.
Someone said once, "We are the only minority born into the enemy camp." It can certainly feel that way when a family member casually spews out antigay jokes and opinions, assuming everyone present has the same point of view.
DEEP-SEA VENTS Water that's been heated deep beneath the earth spews out of deep-sea vents.
In that scenario, as matter falls onto a galactic black hole, the material releases huge amounts of energy that the galaxy then spews out. But QSSC simply does not require black holes, he says.
When carbon dioxide spews out of automobile tailpipes, not all of it stays in the atmosphere.
Anderson of the \niversity of Wisconsin-Madison, agrees with a widely accepted model in which a disk of captured matter spews out a stream of intense energy as its mass disappears into the gravitational clutches of a black hole.
Most seamounts that dot the ocean floor arise when hot, molten basaltic rock spews out of volcanoes and builds layer upon layer.