spend


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spend like a sailor (on (shore) leave)

To spend excessively, extravagantly, or wastefully. Now don't go spending like a sailor on shore leave just because you got a bit of a tax refund from the government. The local council has been spending like sailors on this new tram project, while other existing public transport goes into disrepair. Every time my husband's paycheck comes through, he goes out to the pubs and spends like a sailor on leave!
See also: like, sailor, spend

king's ransom

A very large sum of money. I've always wanted to vacation in Hawaii, but the plane tickets cost a king's ransom.
See also: ransom

spend money like a drunken sailor

To spend money freely and frivolously. Because I've been spending money like a drunken sailor, I don't have enough to pay my rent this month.
See also: drunken, like, money, sailor, spend

don't spend it all in one place

A humorous phrase said when one is given money, especially an insignificant amount of money. Whenever grandma comes to visit, she always gives me a dollar and says, "Don't spend it all in one place!"
See also: all, one, place, spend

spend a penny

euphemism To go to the toilet. Primarily heard in UK. A: "Where's Janet?" B: "She's gone to spend a penny."
See also: penny, spend

spend money like water

To spend money excessively or wastefully. For years he was an absolute penny-pincher. Now that he's got a steady job, he spends money like water.
See also: like, money, spend, water

make a packet

To make a very large amount of money, especially by doing something very successfully. We'll make a packet if we can manage to secure a trading partner in China. I hear Sarah is making a packet with sales from her latest novel.
See also: make, packet

spend a packet

To spend a very large amount of money, especially all at the same time. We spent a packet securing our partnership with the Chinese manufacturers. I hear Sarah is spending a packet to have her novel self-published.
See also: packet, spend

spend the night

1. To sleep in another person's house as their guest. My son is spending the night at his friend's house tonight. It's getting late, so why don't you both spend the night in our spare room?
2. By extension, to spend the night in someone's bed, with the implication of having sex with them. Are you sure you're ready for him to spend the night? You've only been going out for a couple weeks. Even when I was in my mid-20s, my parents still didn't allow my girlfriend to spend the night with me.
See also: night, spend

spending money

A small amount of money one carries to spend on nonessential things. I give the kids 10 bucks at the start of the week as a bit of spending money. If they spend it all, then that's all they get till the next Monday. The company has given me a bit of spending money while I'm here, so why don't we go find somewhere nice to eat?
See also: money, spend

pocket money

A small amount of money one carries to spend on nonessential things. I give the kids 10 bucks at the start of the week as a bit of pocket money. If they spend it all, then that's all they get till the next Monday. The company has given me a bit of pocket money while I'm here, so why don't we go find somewhere nice to eat?
See also: money, pocket

Don't spend it all in one place.

Prov. a phrase said after giving someone some money, especially a small amount of money. Fred: Dad, can I have a dollar? Father: Sure. Here. Don't spend it all in one place. "Here's a quarter, kid," said Tom, flipping Fred a quarter. "Don't spend it all in one place."
See also: all, one, place, spend

*king's ransom

Fig. a great deal of money. (To pay an amount as large as one might have to pay to get back a king held for ransom. *Typically: cost ~; pay ~; spend~.) I would like to buy a nice watch, but I don't want to pay a king's ransom for it. It's a lovely house. I bet it cost a king's ransom.
See also: ransom

spend money like it's going out of style

 and spend money like there's no tomorrow
Fig. to spend money recklessly; to spend money as if it were worthless or will soon be worthless. Extravagant? she spends money like it's going out of style! I can't control it. I spend money like there is no tomorrow.
See also: going, like, money, of, out, spend, style

spend something for something

to pay out an amount of money for something. I spent nearly forty dollars for that vase! How much did you spend for this houseif I may ask?
See also: spend

spend something on someone or something

to pay out an amount of money for the benefit of someone or something. How much did you spend on him for his birthday? I spent a lot on Mary's gift.
See also: on, spend

spend time in something

to stay in something or some place for a period of time. I spent time in Barbados when I was younger. I am afraid that you will have to spend some time in the hospital until the infection is cleared up.
See also: spend, time

spending money

cash, as opposed to money in the bank. I'm a little short of spending money at the present. Could I borrow ten dollars? I don't have any spending money either.
See also: money, spend

tax-and-spend

spending freely and taxing heavily. (Referring to a legislative body that repeatedly passes expensive new laws and keeps raising taxes to pay for the cost. Fixed order.) I hope that people do not elect another tax-and-spend Congress this time. The only thing worse than a tax-and-spend legislature is one that spends and runs up a worsening deficit.

king's ransom

A huge sum of money, as in That handmade rug must have cost a king's ransom. This metaphoric expression originally referred to the sum required to release a king from captivity. [Late 1400s]
See also: ransom

pocket money

Also, spending money. Cash for incidental or minor expenses, as in They don't believe in giving the children pocket money without asking them to do chores, or Can I borrow a dollar? I'm out of all my spending money. The first term, dating from the early 1600s, alludes to keeping small sums in one's pocket; the second alludes to money that may be spent (as opposed to saved) and dates from the late 1500s.
See also: money, pocket

spend money like water

If someone spends money like water, they regularly spend a lot of money. So she liked a drink, loved her horses and spent money like water. So what?
See also: like, money, spend, water

spend a penny

urinate. British informal
At one time coin-operated locks were commonly found on the doors of public lavatories. The phrase is now rather dated.
See also: penny, spend

make, lose, spend, etc. a ˈpacket

(informal) make, etc. a large amount of money: He went to the USA and made a packet in office property.We spent a packet on our weekend away — everything was so expensive.
See also: packet

spend the ˈnight with somebody/together

stay with somebody for a night and have sex with them: James told me Kim and Robin spent the night together.

spend a ˈpenny

(old-fashioned, British English, informal) go to the toilet; urinate: Do you want to spend a penny before we leave?In the past, public toilets in England had coin operated locks, which cost one penny to open.
See also: penny, spend

spending money

n. cash, as opposed to money in the bank. I’m a little short of spending money at the present. Could I borrow ten dollars?
See also: money, spend
References in periodicals archive ?
In effect, the government would say that if private individuals do not want to spend money to improve their welfare, then the government will spend it for them.
In order to ensure the tax would mainly affect luxury items and not fall heavily on the poor (who have to spend a larger proportion of their incomes on necessities), the tax would be steeply progressive.
The state education establishment is awash in money, and California does not need to spend more on education.
An improving economy could ultimately result in there being more money to spend on needed infrastructure, but current economic realities are forcing businesses to tighten their belts and spend cautiously, prompting critics to say that (CIOs) often have to kick and scream to get the CFO's attention.
Instead, he wants Congress to prepare a one-page budget spelling out how much the government can spend in each of the 19 budget categories.
If the dollar is in wages, the employer must spend an extra 7.
Above all, it will supply greatly enhanced management information on the nature of our spend in this important area of our cost base.
People are just choosing to spend when it counts, and we think they'll spend for the holidays,'' said Scott Krugman, NRF spokesman.
Wholesale payments processing spend by activity for Europe and North America (Databook)
The older ones spend more and don't limit themselves to just one discipline, as spending on one sport tends to lead to spending on another.
Male spend is less than half that of females in Europe and the US
In expansions, personal income increases, allowing the government to spend a lot, only to be faced with the need for dramatic cuts as personal income declines in a recession.
Advanced Learning Algorithms and Collaborative User Capabilities Allow Procurement Professionals to Easily Drill Down on Spend
Youngsters from LAUSD's middle schools, who are identified as at-risk, spend four weeks in the camplike setting, supervised by National Guard counselors and attending classes run by Cuesta Community College.
Flynn faces two challengers and has raised $24,193 and spent $22,716 in his re-election bid, more than the $3,000 challenger Arlene Fraser has said she expects to spend.