spend


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spend like a sailor (on (shore) leave)

To spend excessively, extravagantly, or wastefully. Now don't go spending like a sailor on shore leave just because you got a bit of a tax refund from the government. The local council has been spending like sailors on this new tram project, while other existing public transport goes into disrepair. Every time my husband's paycheck comes through, he goes out to the pubs and spends like a sailor on leave!
See also: like, sailor, spend

king's ransom

A very large sum of money. I've always wanted to vacation in Hawaii, but the plane tickets cost a king's ransom.
See also: ransom

spend money like a drunken sailor

To spend money freely and frivolously. Because I've been spending money like a drunken sailor, I don't have enough to pay my rent this month.
See also: drunken, like, money, sailor, spend

don't spend it all in one place

A humorous phrase said when one is given money, especially an insignificant amount of money. Whenever grandma comes to visit, she always gives me a dollar and says, "Don't spend it all in one place!"
See also: all, one, place, spend

spend a penny

euphemism To go to the toilet. Primarily heard in UK. A: "Where's Janet?" B: "She's gone to spend a penny."
See also: penny, spend

spend money like water

To spend money excessively or wastefully. For years he was an absolute penny-pincher. Now that he's got a steady job, he spends money like water.
See also: like, money, spend, water

make a packet

To make a very large amount of money, especially by doing something very successfully. We'll make a packet if we can manage to secure a trading partner in China. I hear Sarah is making a packet with sales from her latest novel.
See also: make, packet

spend a packet

To spend a very large amount of money, especially all at the same time. We spent a packet securing our partnership with the Chinese manufacturers. I hear Sarah is spending a packet to self-publish her novel.
See also: packet, spend

spend the night

1. To sleep in another person's house as their guest. My son is spending the night at his friend's house tonight. It's getting late, so why don't you both spend the night in our spare room?
2. By extension, to spend the night in someone's bed, with the implication of having sex with them. Are you sure you're ready for him to spend the night? You've only been going out for a couple weeks. Even when I was in my mid-20s, my parents still didn't allow my girlfriend to spend the night with me.
See also: night, spend

spending money

A small amount of money one carries to spend on nonessential things. I give the kids 10 bucks at the start of the week as a bit of spending money. If they spend it all, then that's all they get till the next Monday. The company has given me a bit of spending money while I'm here, so why don't we go find somewhere nice to eat?
See also: money, spend

pocket money

A small amount of money one carries to spend on nonessential things. I give the kids 10 bucks at the start of the week as a bit of pocket money. If they spend it all, then that's all they get till the next Monday. The company has given me a bit of pocket money while I'm here, so why don't we go find somewhere nice to eat?
See also: money, pocket

spend the rest of (one's) life

To spend the remaining portion of one's life (doing something or being some place). Honestly, I'd love to retire by the water some place and spend the rest of my life fixing up old boats. My grandmother always said she would spend the rest of her life in South America if she could.
See also: life, of, rest, spend

spend the rest of (one's) days

To spend the remaining portion of one's life (doing something or being some place). Honestly, I'd love to retire by the water some place and spend the rest of my days fixing up old boats. My grandmother always said she would spend the rest of her days in South America if she could.
See also: days, of, rest, spend

spend (something) for (something)

1. To spend some amount of money in order to purchase some product or service. I'd be willing to spend around $1,000 at most for a new refrigerator. If you spend the bare minimum for your computer, you can't expect it to give you top of the line performance.
2. To expend some amount of time doing something. A lot of people struggle to spend enough time for family when they are the primary earners in their households. I make a point of spending an hour each day for yoga and meditation. This new operating system is so large that you should expect to spend a couple hours for the installation.
See also: spend

spend money like it's going out of style

To spend money very quickly and in great quantities. We had a table of people in the restaurant last night who were obviously very wealthy, because they spent money like it was going out of style. After getting his Christmas bonus, Jim started spending money like it was going out of style.
See also: going, like, money, of, out, spend, style

spend (something) on (someone or something)

1. To spend some amount of money in order to pay for some product or service. I'd be willing to spend around $1,000 at most on a new refrigerator. If you spend the bare minimum on your computer, you can't expect it to give you top-of-the-line performance. It's insane to me that you have to spend tens of thousands of dollars on college education.
2. To spend some amount of money for the benefit of someone else. I feel like my girlfriends spends too much money on me, but she always brushes it aside whenever I bring it up. My parents could never spend much on us when we were growing up, so I'm always a little incredulous toward parents who buy their kids whatever they want.
3. To expend some amount of time doing or working on This new operating system is so large that you should expect to spend a couple hours on the installation. I make a point of spending an hour each day on yoga and meditation. The reports should just be summaries, so don't spend too much time on them.
See also: on, spend

spend (some amount of time) in (some place)

To be in some building, town, country, etc., for some amount of time. I spent a lot of my childhood in the library, learning about as many things as I could. We're only spending a couple of days in Rome, so we have to be very pragmatic about what we can see. I spent about four years in Tokyo teaching English before eventually moving back to Canada.
See also: amount, of, spend

tax-and-spend

Characterized by excessive spending and government expansion funded by excessive taxation. Used before a noun. The average working class citizen is sick of the tax-and-spend policies of this administration. The candidate is running her campaign as an attack against a tax-and-spend government that she claims is suffocating the country.

Don't spend it all in one place.

Prov. a phrase said after giving someone some money, especially a small amount of money. Fred: Dad, can I have a dollar? Father: Sure. Here. Don't spend it all in one place. "Here's a quarter, kid," said Tom, flipping Fred a quarter. "Don't spend it all in one place."
See also: all, one, place, spend

*king's ransom

Fig. a great deal of money. (To pay an amount as large as one might have to pay to get back a king held for ransom. *Typically: cost ~; pay ~; spend~.) I would like to buy a nice watch, but I don't want to pay a king's ransom for it. It's a lovely house. I bet it cost a king's ransom.
See also: ransom

spend money like it's going out of style

 and spend money like there's no tomorrow
Fig. to spend money recklessly; to spend money as if it were worthless or will soon be worthless. Extravagant? she spends money like it's going out of style! I can't control it. I spend money like there is no tomorrow.
See also: going, like, money, of, out, spend, style

spend something for something

to pay out an amount of money for something. I spent nearly forty dollars for that vase! How much did you spend for this houseif I may ask?
See also: spend

spend something on someone or something

to pay out an amount of money for the benefit of someone or something. How much did you spend on him for his birthday? I spent a lot on Mary's gift.
See also: on, spend

spend time in something

to stay in something or some place for a period of time. I spent time in Barbados when I was younger. I am afraid that you will have to spend some time in the hospital until the infection is cleared up.
See also: spend, time

spending money

cash, as opposed to money in the bank. I'm a little short of spending money at the present. Could I borrow ten dollars? I don't have any spending money either.
See also: money, spend

tax-and-spend

spending freely and taxing heavily. (Referring to a legislative body that repeatedly passes expensive new laws and keeps raising taxes to pay for the cost. Fixed order.) I hope that people do not elect another tax-and-spend Congress this time. The only thing worse than a tax-and-spend legislature is one that spends and runs up a worsening deficit.

king's ransom

A huge sum of money, as in That handmade rug must have cost a king's ransom. This metaphoric expression originally referred to the sum required to release a king from captivity. [Late 1400s]
See also: ransom

pocket money

Also, spending money. Cash for incidental or minor expenses, as in They don't believe in giving the children pocket money without asking them to do chores, or Can I borrow a dollar? I'm out of all my spending money. The first term, dating from the early 1600s, alludes to keeping small sums in one's pocket; the second alludes to money that may be spent (as opposed to saved) and dates from the late 1500s.
See also: money, pocket

spend money like water

If someone spends money like water, they regularly spend a lot of money. So she liked a drink, loved her horses and spent money like water. So what?
See also: like, money, spend, water

spend a penny

urinate. British informal
At one time coin-operated locks were commonly found on the doors of public lavatories. The phrase is now rather dated.
See also: penny, spend

make, lose, spend, etc. a ˈpacket

(informal) make, etc. a large amount of money: He went to the USA and made a packet in office property.We spent a packet on our weekend away — everything was so expensive.
See also: packet

spend the ˈnight with somebody/together

stay with somebody for a night and have sex with them: James told me Kim and Robin spent the night together.

spend a ˈpenny

(old-fashioned, British English, informal) go to the toilet; urinate: Do you want to spend a penny before we leave?In the past, public toilets in England had coin operated locks, which cost one penny to open.
See also: penny, spend

spending money

n. cash, as opposed to money in the bank. I’m a little short of spending money at the present. Could I borrow ten dollars?
See also: money, spend
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2017, however, all categories of EMEA IT spend underperformed global averages.
The appreciation of the dollar (and thus the dirham) had a negative effect on tourist spends from non-pegged currencies, with repercussions especially dominant in Asian and European spending.
Russians and the Chinese spend the most on fashion with average transaction sizes three times those of traditional fashion capitals of France or Italy.
And echoing their impressive levels overall, online DIY spend grew 44 per cent and online garden centres saw grew 40 per cent.
EXHIBIT 1 Total Cost of Procurement Cycle as a % of Revenue Has Has Not Initiated Initiated Spend Analysis Spend Analysis Bottom 0.30% 0.08% Performer Median 0.68% 0.34% Top 0.34% 0.68% Performer Note: Table made from bar graph.
In addition, all Spend Radar data centers are SAS 70 Type II certified and our hosting provider is in the process of transitioning from the SAS 70 standard to its international replacement, ISAE 3402.
Of the top 10 spend days, consumer spend was seen mainly on Thursdays and Saturdays.
The UAE will spend $2.99bn this year compared to $2.66bn last year.
The new offering includes a Spend Data Manager and a Real-time Spend Classifier, as well as major enhancements to Emptoris' Spend Analyzer and new Spend and Contract Visibility offerings.
Payne also analyzed data from a mid-'80s election to show that "voting more in favor of spending has no positive effect on a congressman's electoral margin," and that electorally secure congressmen "are just as much in favor of spending as other congressmen." Payne maintained that it was being in Congress, which entails listening almost constantly to lobbyists' arguments for more government spending, that persuaded congressmen to spend, not a calculated attempt to buy off votes.
Bush revisited these contrasting philosophies when he observed at an October 19 campaign stop in Pennsylvania: "Republicans have a clear philosophy: We believe that the people who know best how to spend your money are the people that earn that money, and that is you.
Gene Copello, MD, executive director of the AIDS Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based advocacy organization, also would significantly boost Ryan White funding if given $40 billion to spend, and he'd double allocations to the National Institutes of Health for HIV-related research, currently funded at slightly less than $3 billion annually.
According to the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), a London research center on conflict, governments in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Venezuela will spend a combined US$30.70 billion on their militaries this year.
We also looked at marketing diversity--how companies spend their marketing and advertising dollars in outreach efforts to the black community, whose projected spending power will be $965 billion by 2010.
THE amount of money Britons spend on DIY has soared by 75% during the past 10 years, research showed today.