species


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

endangered species

1. Literally, a species that is in danger of becoming extinct. Once an endangered species, these majestic creatures have made a great comeback with the help of preservation efforts.
2. By extension, something that is already very rare or could soon become rare. I worry that this type of work will soon be an endangered species if funding keeps getting cut.
See also: endanger, species

the female of the species is more deadly than the male

Women are dangerous. The phrase implies that women are more dangerous than men, likening them to animal species in which the female is more powerful or aggressive than the male. The phrase comes from Rudyard Kipling's 1911 poem, "The Female of the Species." Jane might look tiny, but she's a tough broad, and she brings that old saying to mind—the female of the species is more deadly than the male.
See also: deadly, female, male, more, of, species

female of the species is more deadly than the male

Prov. In many animal species, the female is poisonous and the male is not, and, by analogy, women are more dangerous than men. Bill: My old girlfriend's been threatening me ever since I broke up with her, but she's too small and weak to do me any harm. Fred: I'd be careful if I were you. The female of the species is more deadly than the male.
See also: deadly, female, male, more, of, species

endangered species

A group threatened with extinction or destruction. For example, Workers willing to put in overtime without extra pay are an endangered species, or With the new budget cuts, public television has become an endangered species. This expression, originally referring to species of plants or animals in danger of dying out, began in the 1980s to be extended to anything or anyone becoming rare.
See also: endanger, species

an endangered species

If you describe something as an endangered species, you mean that there are not many of them left. Business class is in danger of becoming an endangered species, except on long flights. Bassoons, oboes and the big brass instruments are endangered species because children do not want to play them. Note: This expression comes from the literal meaning of a plant or animal that is likely to die out soon.
See also: endanger, species
References in periodicals archive ?
Section 4(a) of the ESA dictates how species are listed as endangered or threatened, and are delisted and reclassified.
Some new hybrid species arise with an increase in the number of chromosomes.
Here, ENM (or something akin to it) is used to investigate landscapes for areas that meet the ecologic requirements of the species. The result is an interpolation between known sampling locations informed by observed associations between the species and environmental characteristics.
Fisher hopes that by documenting all of the unique ant species in Madagascar, he can help to save the country's rapidly disappearing forests.
Even though bald eagles are making a strong return, some scientists aren't sure that these birds should be removed from the endangered species list anytime soon.
This fine monograph is not just a tour de force by the authors but also an honour to Canadian palaeontology itself: out of the 32 new species fully 23 are named for Canadian palaeontologists and geologists (including field assistants).
The three species include two high molecular weight species (H.
The debate over changing species composition is in its infancy.
Only a small fraction of the world's plant species has been studied in detail but as many as half are threatened with extinction.
Tree-climbing rats feast on bird eggs, and further damage is done by feral cats, pigs, goats, dogs and mongooses--all introduced species. The islands' biggest native mammal is the hoary bat.
* Introduced tree species have been brought into the United States.
Recent comparative sequencing and analysis of 10 genes in 13 vertebrate species has found hundreds of identical and potentially functional sequences in stretches of the genome that scientists once referred to as "junk,' DNA.
Some wood species have fiber properties that provide particular values in finished products, and contamination with other species reduces their value.