speaking for oneself

speak for (oneself)

1. To express one's opinion as one's own, and not represent it as being indicative of anyone else's. Used as an imperative when there is disagreement. A: "We just love traveling." B: "Speak for yourself—I think it's exhausting."
2. To express one's own opinion or point of view, especially in contrast to those of others. She needs to speak for herself—I'm not a mind-reader! Speaking for myself, I haven't noticed any of the problems that David is bringing up.
See also: speak

speaking for oneself

an expression indicating that one is expressing only one's own opinion. Speaking for myself, I am ready to cancel the contract. Sally is speaking for herself. She is not expressing our opinions.
See also: speaking
References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking for Oneself: Wittgenstein, Nabokov and Sartre on How (Not) to Be a Philistine, BENJAMIN DE MESEL
But Alcoff questions the wisdom, and the possibility, of only speaking for oneself. She argues that the idea that one can only speak for oneself not only reinforces Western liberal fantasies that each individual somehow consists of a separate little world, unattached to others; she also says that the belief that one can only speak for oneself constitutes an attempt to thwart criticism and accountability, and is, at heart, a delusional and dishonest disavowal of power.
I think Cavell's emphasis on "the first person voice" or "speaking for oneself" represents the most honest way of doing philosophy since this idea acknowledges that doing philosophy cannot pretend to speak for all men; it would be a big lie if philosophy pretends to do so.
"Speaking for oneself" is a relatively new concept in research and such subjective approaches have been historically discredited and marginalized in academia.