spare the rod and spoil the child


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spare the rod and spoil the child.

Prov. You should punish a child when he or she misbehaves, because if you do not, the child will grow up expecting everyone to indulge him or her. Jane: How can you allow your little boy to be so rude? Ellen: It distresses me to punish him. Jane: lean understand that, but spare the rod and spoil the child.
See also: and, child, rod, spare, spoil

spare the rod and spoil the child

Discipline is necessary for good upbringing, as in She lets Richard get away with anything-spare the rod, you know. This adage appears in the Bible (Proverbs 13:24) and made its way into practically every proverb collection. It originally referred to corporal punishment. It is still quoted, often in shortened form, and today does not necessarily mean physical discipline.
See also: and, child, rod, spare, spoil

spare the rod and spoil the child

People say spare the rod and spoil the child, to mean that if you do not punish a child severely when the child behaves badly, their behaviour will become worse. Kids needed authority figures — spare the rod and spoil the child. Note: People sometimes just say spare the rod. We believe in discipline. We don't spare the rod.
See also: and, child, rod, spare, spoil
References in periodicals archive ?
In the times of our great-grandfather the law of the land was spare the rod and spoil the child.
Those people who say spare the rod and spoil the child should take a look at the man I became - even I don't like myself.
In Proverbs, it says, in effect, spare the rod and spoil the child.
There's an old saying: spare the rod and spoil the child, but we mustn't talk about corporal punishment.
All the do-gooders who spare the rod and spoil the child have created a very bad situation causing turmoil, terror and fear.