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have the attention span of a gnat

To be easily distracted. My son has the attention span of a gnat, I swear. If I tell him to do something, he forgets about it almost instantly! We all have the attention span of gnats after so many years of multitasking.
See also: attention, gnat, have, of, span

have the attention span of a mosquito

To be easily distracted. My son has the attention span of a mosquito, I swear. If I tell him to do something, he forgets about it almost instantly! We all have the attention span of mosquitoes after so many years of multitasking.
See also: attention, have, of, span

spick and span

Totally clean and/or organized. I plan to spend the day cleaning so that this place is spick and span when my mother-in-law arrives.
See also: and, span
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

spick and span

Neat and clean, as in When Ruth has finished cleaning, the whole house is spick and span. This term combines two nouns that are now obsolete, spick, "a nail" or "spike," and span, "a wooden chip." In the 1500s a sailing ship was considered spick and span when every spike and chip was brand-new. The transfer to the current sense took place in the mid-1800s.
See also: and, span
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

spick and span

mainly BRITISH
If a place is spick and span, it is very clean and tidy. Note: `Spick' is sometimes spelled `spic'. Ann was dusting the furniture, making sure her home was spick and span. The facilities were all spick and span. Note: You can also use spick-and-span before a noun. Its bright new buildings already resemble a spic-and-span Japanese car plant. Note: This expression has developed from an old-fashioned expression `spick and span-new', meaning `very new'. `Spick' probably came from a Dutch word meaning `new', and `span-new' meant `completely new'.
See also: and, span
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

ˌspick and ˈspan

(also ˌspic and ˈspan) clean, tidy and fresh: The boss likes everything spick and span in the office.
See also: and, span
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

spick and span

Neat and clean. This term is made up of two now obsolete words, spick, meaning a spike or nail, and span, meaning a wood chip. In the days of sailing ships, a spick and span ship was one in which every spike or nail and every (wooden) chip was new. The alliterative pairing of the two is very old indeed, although originally the expression meant “brand-new.” It appeared in Sir Thomas North’s translation of Plutarch’s Lives (1579): “They were all in goodly gilt armours, and brave purple cassocks upon them, spicke, and spanne newe.”
See also: and, span
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

spic and span

Neat and clean. A “spick” was a nail (as in “spike”), “span” was a wood shaving, and a new wooden object had shiny spicks in it and fresh spans around it. Over the years the meaning of newness was replaced by that of something fresh and clean (as a new object usually was).
See also: and, span, spic
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in periodicals archive ?
span xml:lang="EN-ZAYour fauvorite childhood books?
span xml:lang="EN-ZAThey're both really honest books, with real people in them and I can say that they took me to the very first trips (considering that reading is a traveling of sorts) into the American South.span xml:lang="EN-ZAI mean I liked Dahls, The BFG and a whole lot more of his books, but we're speaking about the books one really, really loved, right?span xml:lang="EN-ZAIf you were to dine with three writers dead or alive, who would they be and why?span xml:lang="EN-ZAYvonne Vera, worked as the director for the National Gallery of Zimbabwe and she also writes images, pictures, that you can actually see when reading her.
span xml:lang="EN-ZAI would be so interested to know the things, and the art that she's seen.
span xml:lang="EN-ZAVirginia Woolf because I need all that sass in my life!
Why would the worm, or any animal, have a gene such as daf-2 whose apparent purpose is to limit the organism's life span?
Kenyon found something more intriguing: Certain subtle mutations in the gene enabled a developing worm to bypass the dauer state but still have an abnormally long life span.
PULLING OUT ALL THE STOPS In their 1993 report, Kenyon and her colleagues speculated that the identification of genes under the sway of daf-16" could lead to a general understanding of how life span can be extended." In a flurry of recent publications, some of those genes have finally come to light.