spam

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spam

1. n. something disliked, typically, but not necessarily, food. (From the brand name of a canned meat product.) I can’t eat this “spam.” It could be spoiled.
2. n. one or a series of uninvited email messages advertising money-making schemes, pornography, or sales of any kind. If I don’t recognize the sender, I assume the message is spam and I delete it.
3. tv. to clutter or fill someone’s email account with spam (sense 2). Some jerk is spamming me with an advertisement for dirty pictures.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the whole, Hawkins maintained that terminating Map Maker would just enable spammers to hide easily instead of vanquishing them for good.
Did you know that "Chicken boner" is what critics call spammers, implying that they spend all their time in front of a computer with fried chicken bones littering the floor?
The law was supported by legislators on both sides of Congress, major service providers including Yahoo, AOL and Microsoft, industry organizations including the Direct Marketing Association, and spammers including the notorious Alan Ralsky.
Activists argued that such a law would be meaningless: a spammer might operate multiple lists from multiple front companies and they would still be free to trade email addresses with their fellow spammers.
There's only one way to defeat spammers and it's a simple solution.
Titled "A New Approach to Defeating Spam," the white paper describes the problems caused by spam, the techniques spammers use to circumvent conventional anti-spam solutions, and the new paradigm Abaca has developed to combat spam.
According to a report by Blue Security, spammers and phishers are using so-called "registration attacks" and "password reminder attacks" to build wide-ranging profiles of online users.
Those ever-crafty spammers have found new ways into the e-mail accounts of the world.
The important thing to keep in mind is to constantly monitor spammer techniques.
In March the Center for Democracy and Technology released the results of a six-month study on how spammers get people's addresses; the most popular method was to harvest them from Usenet or the Web.
Paper-based spam is an obvious non starter, while e-mail spammers, with the right software, can send hundreds of thousands of messages to computer users all over the world with a click of a mouse without paying anything more than their monthly Internet service provider (ISP) fee.
And, most notably, it reveals the identity of the spammer.
So, not only are you not affecting the spammer, you're spamming someone else and tying up valuable bandwidth in the process, making the situation worse.
A budding spammer can purchase a list of a million addresses for only $11.
The list maker would argue that, by purchasing and employing the list, the company that is blocking the email has stated its intention not to have contact with the alleged spammer, and therefore the interference is not "tortuous.