sound bite


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soundbite

A short statement that is remarkable in some way, typically one that has been recorded, often excerpted from a longer speech, interview, press conference, etc., especially as used during a news report or something similar. The soundbite used in the news report was taken completely out of context, creating an implication of criminal intent that is completely absence when the full recording is heard. I interviewed him for two hours but didn't get any soundbites—everything he says is so boring.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

sound bite

A short, striking, quotable statement well suited to a television news program. For example, He's extremely good at sound bites, but a really substantive speech is beyond him. This slangy expression, first recorded in 1980, originated in political campaigns in which candidates tried to get across a particular message or get publicity by having it picked up in newscasts.
See also: bite, sound
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sound bite

A brief, catchy excerpt from a speech or interview made on television or the radio that is widely repeated on news programs. Although there have been many such oft-quoted statements, the term dates only from about 1980. Sound bites are used particularly often during election campaigns, in which candidates try to get across a single message or obtain publicity through its repetition. Sometimes the term is used disparagingly, suggesting that the speaker had nothing more substantive to say.
See also: bite, sound
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sound bite: Nurses support public policy that promotes healthy lifestyles.
Which, in part, is why we have abandoned lengthy sound bites for radically shorter ones, and then abandoned those, too, in favor of images.
Campaign sound bite: In my state, we cut the number of abortions without undercutting a woman's right to choose.
During the 1968 presidential race, when President Nixon ran against Hubert Humphrey, the average length of one of their sound bites on network news was 43 seconds.
Sound bite: "Our program budgets have not been affected at all; expenditure has never been higher, but we are looking to restructure our current (Hollywood studio) output deals and invest more in local programming."
Every merger comes with a "sound bite" justification.
The Sound Bite Society: Television and the American Mind.
The staff member who gains the love of all campers may not have the ability to communicate that same trust and caring in a video sound bite. The camp director who demands that a brochure or video be edited to accurately reflect the true "camp heroes" may be bypassing the opportunity to best meet prospects' perceptions and expectations.
ABOUT 18 MONTHS AGO OUR FRIENDLY LENDERS INTRODUCED a new industry sound bite. They told the senior housing and health care industries that they were "embarking on a flight to quality." Properly decoded, this means that lenders are focusing more on the safe, high-quality loan transactions and less on just any deal presented to them.
He was clearly determined to get a God-free sound bite from his subject.
Any positive social change depends on our ability to cut through the sound bite level of political analysis.
It was the "sound bite" played most frequently by the TV networks covering that meeting.
Sound bite politics plays into the hands of bigotry and brings out the very worst in people.
"Obama is already President and most people think Romney is qualified to be President, so it comes down to sidestepping a killer mistake or sound bite," a former senior aide to a Republican President said.
"The Prime Minister has sent out sound bite after sound bite telling us that he will be tough on those failing banks."