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(as) cross as a bear with a sore head

Exceptionally irritable, annoyed, or grumpy. John is always cross as a bear with a sore head first thing in the morning; it's best not to even talk to him until he's had his coffee. Janet was as cross as a bear with a sore head when she found out she had missed her connecting flight.
See also: bear, cross, head, sore

a sore loser

Someone who complains, becomes upset, or otherwise reacts very negatively when they fail or lose at something competitive. Don't be such a sore loser, Jim. I know you pride yourself on your racquetball skills, but I beat you fair and square.
See also: loser, sore

like a bear with a sore head

Exceptionally irritable, annoyed, or grumpy. John is always like a bear with a sore head first thing in the morning—it's best not to even talk to him until he's had his coffee. Janet was like a bear with a sore head when she found out she had missed her connecting flight.
See also: bear, head, like, sore

sore point

A topic that makes one angry or uncomfortable. Whatever you do, don't mention his ex-wife—his divorce is really a sore point with him.
See also: point, sore

sore spot

A topic that makes one angry or uncomfortable. Whatever you do, don't mention his ex-wife—his divorce is really a sore spot with him.
See also: sore, spot

be a sight for sore eyes

To be someone or something that one is excited or overjoyed to see, often after a long absence or separation. Charlie, I can't believe you're back in town! Get over here, you're a sight for sore eyes! I'm so tired after being on tour. My bed is a sight for sore eyes.
See also: eye, sight, sore

be like a bear with a sore head

To be exceptionally irritable, annoyed, or grumpy. John is always like a bear with a sore head first thing in the morning—it's best not to even talk to him until he's had his coffee. Janet was like a bear with a sore head when she found out she had missed her connecting flight.
See also: bear, head, like, sore

stand out like a sore thumb

To be very conspicuous. I grew up in California, so when I moved to Minnesota, I stood out like a sore thumb. Unfortunately the cover will need to be redesigned. The error in the image stands out like a sore thumb.
See also: like, out, sore, stand, thumb

stick out like a sore thumb

To be very conspicuous. Primarily heard in UK. I grew up in California, so when I moved to Minnesota, I stuck out like a sore thumb. Unfortunately the cover will need to be redesigned. The error in the image sticks out like a sore thumb.
See also: like, out, sore, stick, thumb

sight for sore eyes

Fig. a welcome sight. Oh, am I glad to see you here! You're a sight for sore eyes. I'm sure hungry. This meal is a sight for sore eyes.
See also: eye, sight, sore

*sore (at someone)

Fig. angry at someone. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; make someone ~.) When Mary hears what you said about her, she'll get sore for sure. Please don't get sore at me.

stick out

to project outward. You can't lock your suitcase because there is a bit of cloth sticking out. some cloth stuck out of the top of the drawer.
See also: out, stick

stick out

(from someone or something) to project outward from someone or something. His right arm, which was in a cast, stuck out from him like a crane. His arm stuck out.
See also: out, stick

stick out like a sore thumb

Fig. to be very obvious. That pimple really sticks out like a sore thumb. Do you think I would stick out like a sore thumb at the party if I wear this coat?
See also: like, out, sore, stick, thumb

stick out (of someone or something)

to protrude from someone or something. The arrow stuck out of him, wobbling as he staggered. A dollar bill stuck out of the book. What a strange bookmark.
See also: out, stick

stick something out

to endure something; to stay with something. (The something can be vaguely expressed using it.) I will stick it out as long as I can. she stuck out the abuse as long as she could; then she started looking for another job.
See also: out, stick

touch a sore spot

 and touch a sore point
Fig. to refer to a sensitive matter that will upset someone. (Fig. on the notion of touching an injury and causing pain.) I seem to have touched a sore spot. I'm sorry. I didn't mean to upset you. When you talk to him, avoid talking about money. It's best not to touch a sore point if possible.
See also: sore, spot, touch

cross as a bear

Grumpy, ill-humored, annoyed, as in Stay away from Claire; she's cross as a bear this morning. Unlike the earlier cross as two stocks, this survives even though the adjective cross for "ill-tempered" is otherwise not used much in America. It is sometimes amplified as cross as a bear with a sore head. [Early 1700s]
See also: bear, cross

sight for sore eyes, a

One whom it is a relief or joy to see, as in Linda, who had not seen him in 15 years, told him he was a sight for sore eyes. This idiom implies an appearance so welcome that it heals ailing eyes. [First half of 1700s]
See also: sight, sore

sore point, a

A sensitive or annoying issue, as in Don't mention diets to Elsie; it's a sore point with her. This idiom was first recorded as a sore place in 1690.
See also: sore

stick out

1. Also, stick out a mile or like a sore thumb. Be very prominent or conspicuous, as in Dad's funny hat made him stick out in the crowd, or That purple house sticks out a mile, or John's lie sticks out like a sore thumb. The first term dates from the mid-1500s, the variants from the first half of the 1900s. The variant using thumb alludes to the propensity for holding an injured thumb stiffly, making it stand out (and thereby risking further injury).
2. Continue doing something, endure something, as in I know you don't like it but you have to stick out the job for another month. [Late 1600s] A variant is stick it out, as in His new play's boring, but since he's my cousin we'd better stick it out. [Late 1800s] Also see stick it, def. 1.
See also: out, stick

like a bear with a sore head

mainly BRITISH, INFORMAL
If someone is like a bear with a sore head, they are being very bad-tempered and irritable. What was wrong with Mario this afternoon? He was like a bear with a sore head! He's like a bear with a sore head in the mornings.
See also: bear, head, like, sore

a sight for sore eyes

If someone or something is a sight for sore eyes, they are very attractive to look at. The sunset over the Strait of Malacca is a sight for sore eyes. You're a sight for sore eyes in your white dress, Milly!
See also: eye, sight, sore

a sore point

or

a sore spot

COMMON You can say that a subject is a sore point with someone or a sore spot for them if it makes them feel angry, embarrassed, or upset. The continuing presence of foreign troops remains a very sore point with these students. Slow job growth is a sore spot for the US President. Note: If you touch or hit someone's sore point or sore spot, you mention a subject which makes them feel angry, embarrassed, or upset. The mention of Jim Kennerly had touched her sore spot. It was clear by his expression that my question had hit a sore point.
See also: point, sore

stick out like a sore thumb

or

stand out like a sore thumb

If someone or something sticks out like a sore thumb or stands out like a sore thumb, they are very noticeable because they are very different from the other people or things around them. Foreigners are at greater risk of robbery because they are more wealthy and they stick out like a sore thumb. We should ask ourselves: `Does the new housing stick out like a sore thumb or blend into its surroundings?' I much prefer to wear a proper suit, but fear that I will stand out like a sore thumb.
See also: like, out, sore, stick, thumb

stick out

v.
1. To project or protrude: The tag is sticking out of your shirt. A flagpole stuck out from the front of the house.
2. To cause something to project or protrude: The child stuck out her hand for candy. He stuck his tongue out at me.
3. To be prominent; be conspicuous: Do you think a pink suit will stick out too much? This essay stuck out from the other submissions.
4. To endure something: We stuck out two years without electricity or running water. There was only one month left of school, so I stuck it out and transferred the following year.
5. stick out for To resist capitulating in negotiations so as to achieve some more favorable terms: The striking workers stuck out for better wages.
See also: out, stick

sore

mod. angry. She is one sore old lady. You should give her teeth back.

stick out like a sore thumb

in. to be very obvious. Do you think I would stick out like a sore thumb at the party if I wear this coat?
See also: like, out, sore, stick, thumb

touch a sore point

tv. to mention something that upsets someone. I touched a sore point with Larry when I mentioned taxes.
See also: point, sore, touch

sight for sore eyes

Informal
One whom it is a relief or joy to see.
See also: eye, sight, sore