son of the manse


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son of the manse

A son of a minister, typically Presbyterian. Primarily heard in UK. Rogers, a son of the manse, is proving to be one of the most influential—and controversial—of our times.
See also: manse, of, son

son (or daughter) of the manse

the child of a minister, especially a Presbyterian.
See also: manse, of, son
References in periodicals archive ?
It does not go with the ideals of the son of the manse currently running Britain.
He repeatedly stresses he is a son of the Manse - presumably therefore he believes cleanliness is next to godliness and is committed to the 'deep cleaning' of hospitals - involving the temporary closure of wards.
GORDON Brown strategists know full well that if Blair falls on his sword at the Labour Party Conference then the son of the manse will succeed to the Premiership.
The upright, dour son of the manse given a bloody nose in his own backyard by a party plagued by booze and sex scandals.
The son of the manse spoke movingly of his mother and father's lessons - that he should do his best, work hard, respect others, treat them equally, tell the truth, take responsibility.
Beaverbrook liked to insist on his being a Scots son of the manse. His father was a pious, quiet, highly respectable Presbyterian minister in New Brunswick.
For a start, he was the son of the manse, the eldest son of a Conregationalist minister born in Brynaman on the border between Carmarthenshire and the old Glamorgan, when Brynaman was a coal-mining village, and where the Welsh language was - and still is to a large extent - the lingua franca.
Maybe it was his upbringing as a son of the manse, seeing at first hand extreme poverty as he followed his father on church rounds.
Much was made of his refusal to give a straight answer, but I suspect that the reason was that, for a puritanical Son of the Manse like Gordon, the question was simply irrelevant.
And he grew up a son of the manse, in Kirkcaldy, Fife, where they see all sorts of fantasies after a night on the toon.
It's annoying enough to see the Son of the Manse toying with the Tories and the rest of the UK with the "will he, won't he" childishness about a possible election.
With a son of the manse ruling us from Downing Street, the likelihood of the government sponsoring old peoples' admission to places where we can dream - like a racecourse, dog-track or casino - is remote.
The son of the manse has said little about the war and is now positioning himself to appeal to middle Britain by talking about a new drive to get one million more families owning their homes.
What must have been going on in the head of this driven son of the manse as he contemplated the future?