have eyes in the back of (one's) head

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have eyes in the back of (one's) head

To be or seem to be able to detect what is going on all around one, even beyond one's field of vision. My mom always seems to know when we've done something we shouldn't have. She has eyes in the back of her head! Look, just be very careful not to do personal things during the work day—the boss has eyes in the back of his head.
See also: back, eye, have, head, of
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

have eyes in the back of one's head

Fig. to seem to be able to sense what is going on behind or outside of one's field of vision. My teacher seems to have eyes in the back of her head. My teacher doesn't need to have eyes in the back of his head. He watches us very carefully.
See also: back, eye, have, head, of
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

eyes in the back of one's head, have

Be more aware of what is happening than is generally realized. For example, Even when he's away he always knows what the staff are doing-he has eyes in the back of his head , or With such hostile colleagues she needs to have eyes in the back of her head. [Mid-1500s]
See also: back, eye, have, of
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

have eyes in the back of your head

observe everything that is happening even when this is apparently impossible.
1991 Barbara Anderson Girls High They were all in Miss Royston's class who said that she had eyes in the back of her head and they half believed it, because how else did she know.
See also: back, eye, have, head, of
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

have eyes in the back of your ˈhead

(informal) seem to be able to see everything and know what is going on: You have to have eyes in the back of your head to keep control of six lively children.
See also: back, eye, have, head, of
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

eyes in the back of one's head, to have

To be exceptionally alert. This expression dates from Roman times, appearing in Plautus’s play Aulularia (ca. 210 b.c.) and cited by Erasmus in his collection of adages. Put slightly differently, it appeared in John Still’s play Gammer Gurton’s Needle (ca. 1565): “Take heed of Sim Glovers wife, she hath an eie behind her!” (2.2).
See also: back, eye, have, of, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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