solitary wasp

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solitary wasp

A type of wasp that does not live in a social colony. My sister is an entomologist currently studying the behavior of solitary wasps.
See also: solitary, wasp
References in classic literature ?
Bergson, quoting Fabre, has made play with the supposed extraordinary accuracy of the solitary wasp Ammophila, which lays its eggs in a caterpillar.
Female bees provision their nests with a nectar-pollen mixture, whereas solitary wasps may collect a variety of prey to provision their nests, including spiders (Araneae) or caterpillars (Lepidoptera) (Krombein, 1967).
However, this article is concerned not with solitary wasps, but colonial wasps, particularly members of two genera: Polistes (paper wasps) and Dolichovespula (hornets).
The family Mutillidae comprises a diverse group of solitary wasps, with over 4000 described species (Lelej, 2005).
The next most important are solitary wasps,'' he said.
Rightly or wrongly, we often view loners as more of a threat, so it may come as a surprise to learn that of the two types of wasps - solitary wasps and sociable wasps - the latter are the ones causing all the aggro.
Their entry holes in bare ground are difficult to spot and closely resemble those made by ants and solitary wasps.
A condition for sociality to evolve in Hymenoptera is the ability of ancestral solitary wasps and bees to recognize other individuals (Gadagkar 2001), and thus rely on mutual reciprocation to make group living an evolutionary stable strategy (ESS) (Cheney & Seyfarth 1982; Silk et al.
This is in agreement with studies on other species of invertebrate predators responding to olfactory cues associated with their prey, including muricid snails (Carriker & Zandt 1972), tiger beetles (Wilson 1978), ants, (Holldobler & Wilson 1994), and other species of solitary wasps (Evans & Eberhard 1970; Turlings et al.
In fact, the Peckhams publications on the behavior and classification of jumping spiders and behavior of solitary wasps were crucial in supporting the theory of sexual selection and pioneered many of the techniques and concepts associated with ethologists of the mid twentieth century
Also active later in the summer are solitary wasps.
Several species of solitary wasps utilize previously existing cavities for nest construction, including the abandoned mud nests constructed by sphecids, which provide a large number of cavities (open and empty cells).
According to Vargas and Beitia (1996) a factor that may discourage solitary wasps from using trap-nests with diameters larger than their requirements may be the need for larger amounts of materials to supplement the cell partitions.