solitary wasp


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solitary wasp

A type of wasp that does not live in a social colony. My sister is an entomologist currently studying the behavior of solitary wasps.
See also: solitary, wasp
References in periodicals archive ?
These are the solitary wasp subfamily Eumeninae (potter wasps), the largest subfamily in the Vespidae, which includes more than 3,500 described species (Pickett and Carpenter, 2010), and the three social wasp subfamilies, that is, Stenogastrinae, Polistinae, and Vespinae.
Neighbor recognition and context-dependent aggression in a solitary wasp, Sphecius speciosus (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae).
So the next time you get harassed by those angry solitary wasps remember that they are, in fact, jobless, homeless and about to die.
The wasps that sneaked in my photos were part of a large group called the solitary wasps. They diverted my attention enough to inspire my August column.
Female bees provision their nests with a nectar-pollen mixture, whereas solitary wasps may collect a variety of prey to provision their nests, including spiders (Araneae) or caterpillars (Lepidoptera) (Krombein, 1967).
However, this article is concerned not with solitary wasps, but colonial wasps, particularly members of two genera: Polistes (paper wasps) and Dolichovespula (hornets).
The family Mutillidae comprises a diverse group of solitary wasps, with over 4000 described species (Lelej, 2005).
"The next most important are solitary wasps,'' he said.
Rightly or wrongly, we often view loners as more of a threat, so it may come as a surprise to learn that of the two types of wasps - solitary wasps and sociable wasps - the latter are the ones causing all the aggro.
Their entry holes in bare ground are difficult to spot and closely resemble those made by ants and solitary wasps.