sod

(redirected from sodding)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to sodding: turf
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

blow that for a lark

slang A phrase used to dismiss something because it seems too taxing. Primarily heard in UK. Well, blow that for a lark. I'll just return the book tomorrow instead of going out in a snowstorm today.
See also: blow, lark, that

blow this/that for a game of soldiers

slang A phrase used to dismiss something because it seems too taxing. Well, blow that for a game of soldiers. I'll just return the book tomorrow instead of going out in a snowstorm today.
See also: blow, game, of, soldier, that, this

odds and sods

An assortment of small, miscellaneous items, especially those that are not especially important or valuable. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I can never find my what I need amongst all the odds and sods in this drawer! I wish the house weren't so cluttered up with odds and sods.
See also: and, odds, sod

sod all

Nothing whatsoever; very little or nothing of consequence. Primarily heard in UK. I'm trying to get going on this research project, but I've done sod all so far! A: "What did you talk about with your old classmates at the reunion?" B: "Sod all, really. They're quite a boring bunch, after all these years."
See also: all, sod

sod it

1. rude slang An exclamation of annoyance, vexation, exasperation, etc. Equivalent to "damn it." Primarily heard in UK. Oh, sod it! I deleted the file by mistake! Sod it—I stubbed my toe on this bloomin' bedframe! A: "I'm sorry, boss, but I lost the Anderson account." B: "Sod it, Charles! They were our best clients!"
2. rude slang An expression used when one gives up, submits, or yields. Equivalent to "to hell with it." Primarily heard in UK. A: "Don't be such a boring old git, Tom. Come to the pub with us for a pint!" B: "Oh, sod it, all right. Just one, though!" I've been pretty good about sticking to my diet this month, but sod it—it's my birthday, and I'm eating cake!
See also: sod

sod off

1. Get out of here; go away; get lost. Primarily heard in UK. Listen, I don't want to buy any, so why don't you just sod off and leave me alone! Sod off, Jerry! I'm sick of your foolishness.
2. To leave, depart, or flee. Primarily heard in UK. We'll have to wait for the guard to sod off for the night before we try to break in. At the end of the novel, the anti-hero sods off to consider the consequences of his actions.
See also: off, sod

sod that for a lark

rude slang A phrase used to dismiss something because it seems too taxing. Primarily heard in UK. Well, sod that for a lark. I'll just return the book tomorrow instead of going out in a snowstorm today.
See also: lark, sod, that

sod this/that for a game of soldiers

rude slang A phrase used to dismiss something because it seems too taxing. Well, sod that for a game of soldiers. I'll just return the book tomorrow instead of going out in a snowstorm today.
See also: game, of, sod, soldier, that, this

Sod's law

The axiom that if something can go wrong, it will. (Known as "Murphy's Law" in North America.) Primarily heard in UK. The manager always tries to anticipate Sod's law, having us prepare for anything that could possibly go wrong on a project.
See also: law

the old sod

The country of one's birth or lineage; one's native soil. Primarily heard in UK. Some day, when I've earned enough, I'll be able to move my family back to the old sod.
See also: old, sod

blow/sodtaboo ˈthis/ˈthat for a game of soldiers

(British English, slang) used by somebody who does not want to do something because it is annoying or involves too much effort: After waiting for twenty minutes more, he thought ‘sod this for a game of soldiers’, and left.
See also: blow, game, of, sod, soldier, that, this

blow/sodtaboo ˈthat for a lark

(British English, slang) used by somebody who does not want to do something because it involves too much effort: Sod that for a lark! I’m not doing any more tonight.
A lark is a thing that you do for fun or as a joke.
See also: blow, lark, sod, that

ˌSod’s ˈLaw

(British English, humorous) the tendency for things to happen in just the way that you do not want, and in a way that is not useful: The band always plays better when they’re not being recorded — but that’s Sod’s Law, isn’t it?
See also: law

sod off

v. Chiefly British Vulgar Slang
To go away. Used chiefly as a command.
See also: off, sod
References in periodicals archive ?
The absence of depressions where surface water can accumulate suggests that the elevation of the ground surface after tundra sodding has remained relatively stable (Figs.
Not only can tundra sodding revegetate a site in a single growing season, it also results in a plant community that is dominated by indigenous plant species, which is not always the case with other revegetation techniques.
These results also demonstrate that tundra sodding reduces the overall subsidence of the ground surface, a factor that is directly linked with successful revegetation.
The significance of the plant mortality caused by burrowing microtines for the long-term success of tundra sodding is unknown, but will probably vary between years as microtine populations fluctuate.
Despite the obvious benefits offered by tundra sodding, this technique is not a panacea for rehabilitation of disturbed tundra wetlands on the North Slope.
In addition, labor costs associated with sodding are dramatically higher than labor costs or even overall costs associated with other approaches.