society

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Related to societies: Secret societies, Building societies

mutual admiration society

A disparaging term for two (or more) people who engage in lavish mutual praise and admiration. I can't stand working with Tony and Linda. They praise each other from the moment they walk through the door—it's like they've formed a mutual admiration society!
See also: society

pillar of society

One who is a particularly active, respected, and influential member of one's local social sphere. My grandfather was a pillar of society because of how many people his businesses employed. She was long considered a pillar of society, so she won the mayoral election with ease.
See also: of, pillar, society

pillar of the community

One who is a particularly active, respected, and influential member of one's local social sphere. My grandfather was a pillar of the community because of how many people his businesses employed. She was long considered a pillar of the community, so she won the mayoral election with ease.
See also: community, of, pillar

café society

A phrase used to describe the rich and famous subset of society of who spend much of their time going to trendy places, especially in the early 20th century. My grandmother always says that my favorite Hollywood gossip magazines talk about "café society," whatever that is.
See also: society

mutual admiration society

A relationship in which two people have strong feelings of esteem for each other and often exchange lavish compliments. The term may signify either genuine or pretended admiration, as in Each of them praised the other's book-it was a real mutual admiration society. The expression was invented by Henry David Thoreau in his journal (1851) and repeated by Oliver Wendell Holmes and others.
See also: society

society

a pillar of society

or

a pillar of the community

If you describe someone as a pillar of society or a pillar of the community, you mean that they are an active and respected member of a group of people. He is a pillar of society, the son every mother would love to have. My father had been a pillar of the community.
See also: of, pillar, society

a pillar of society

a person regarded as a particularly responsible citizen.
The use of pillar to mean ‘a person regarded as a mainstay or support for something’ is recorded from medieval times; Pillars of Society was the English title of an 1888 play by the Norwegian dramatist Henrik Ibsen .
See also: of, pillar, society

a pillar of soˈciety, etc.

a person who is respected in society, etc.; a person of importance: I couldn’t believe that a pillar of the community like him had been caught stealing from his employer.
See also: of, pillar

pay one’s dues (to society)

tv. to serve a prison or jail sentence. I served ten years in prison. I’ve paid my dues to society. The matter is settled.
See also: due, pay, society

café society

The collective term for socialites and movie celebrities who frequented fashionable restaurants and nightclubs. From the end of World War I through the 1960s, the media covered the comings and goings of members of Society (with a capital S, the word referred to people of “good family,” which in turn meant old money), and glamorous movie stars much as celebrity-chroniclers now report on Paris Hilton, Brad/Angelina, TV reality show personalities, and other boldface celebrities. Among the more popular haunts were Manhattan's Stork Club and El Morocco nightclubs. Then as now, a substantial portion of the population was interested in the lives of their social betters, and newspaper gossip columnists reported on party- and club-goers in the next day's editions. It was one such scribe, Maury Paul (pen-name: Cholly Knickerbocker) who coined the phrase “café society.”
See also: society

mutual admiration society

Two or more people who lavishly praise the other person's or people's personalities and accomplishments, often far beyond what is deserved. The phrase, which is said to have originated with Henry David Thoreau in 1851, may have been used earlier. Its use as the title of a song from the 1956 musical comedy Happy Hunting that was successfully recorded by a number of singers boosted the phrase's popularity.
See also: society
References in periodicals archive ?
Parents in warlike societies do tend to encourage toughness and aggression among boys, but warfare apparently causes this practice rather than vice versa, the Embers argue.
To maintain their consistency black emigrationists had to walk a fine line between unflinching hostility toward white colonization societies and an openness toward proposals for black independence and national autonomy.
Blackwell Publishing is the world's leading society publisher, partnering with 665 societies.
Said Fails, "It is very important to learn that CPAs still rely heavily on state societies for CPE.
Their conceptions of civil society may vary, but such intellectuals clearly recognize the distinction of external civil societies and the state, and aim at distinguishing their own civil societies from their states.
s largest building societies, has implemented the eQuality(R) ContactStore Express software to support its expanding contact centre operation.
She has built an international reputation for introducing contemporary Asian art to a broad audience and using it to illuminate historical trends and their influence on the development of today's societies.
In 2002, in an effort to attract new members and further educate existing members, IEEE Computer Society -- the largest of 37 societies of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) -- began using KnowledgeNet products.
Goldfarb has had numerous administrative, academic and hospital appointments; and is a past chairman of the Council of Subspecialty Societies of the American College of Physicians (1992-1995).
Home of the Free enables us to leverage the participation of nationally recognized photographers, regional historical societies and local schools to create a series of programs and events that engage the entire community.
During the event, kids will raise the flags of their societies above a bounty of colorful booths from which they will sell their wares and services.
28 ballots the standard, several consensus meetings will be held to incorporate input from medical and professional societies and other key stakeholders.
Early in Ness's tenure, the Society added new national-model programs, including TIMELINE, the Society's award-winning popular history magazine, and its outreach program assisting the hundreds of local and county historical organizations in conjunction with the Ohio Association of Historical Societies and Museums.
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