sober

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a sobering thought

A thought or idea which is dispiriting, depressing, or traumatic. It's a sobering thought when you consider how many people go without clean water every day.
See also: sober, thought

wanton kittens make sober cats

One who behaves wildly in youth often shows more restraint in adulthood. I wouldn't worry too much about your son's interest in partying—wanton kittens make sober cats most of the time.
See also: cat, kitten, make, sober

be (as) sober as a judge

1. To be stoic and reserved, perhaps even somber. Anita has been sober as a judge ever since she heard of Marshall's death.
2. To be calm and rational. He's usually as sober as a judge, so I'm confident that he'll make a sound decision.
3. To be not at all intoxicated. I haven't been drinking at all, I swear! I'm sober as a judge!
See also: judge, sober

appeal from Philip drunk to Philip sober

To urge one to rethink something. The phrase refers to King Philip II of Macedon, who handed down an unwelcome decision and was challenged with an appeal to "Philip sober." If you're unhappy with his decision, then why don't you appeal from Philip drunk to Philip sober?
See also: appeal, drunk, sober

stone-cold sober

Completely sober; not intoxicated to any degree by drugs or alcohol. I'm stone-cold sober, so I'll drive us home. No, I'm not high—I've been stone-cold sober from the day I started working here!
See also: sober

(as) sober as a judge

1. To be stoic and reserved, perhaps even somber. Anita has been as sober as a judge ever since she heard of Marshall's death. The coach stood at the side of the field, sober as a judge, as the clock counted down on his team's championship ambitions.
2. To be calm and rational. We need someone who can consider these issues without their emotions interfering—you'll need to be as sober as a judge from beginning to end!
3. To be not at all intoxicated. I haven't been drinking at all, I swear! I'm as sober as a judge! John's remained sober as a judge ever since the car accident three years ago.
See also: judge, sober

sober up

1. To recover from the effects of alcohol or drugs on one's body or mind. I need to sober up soon—I can't go into work staggering around like this! We decided to go take a walk in the cool night air to sober up a little before heading home.
2. To help or cause someone to recover from the effects of alcohol or drugs on one's body or mind. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "sober" and "up." Go make a pot of coffee! We need to sober Kevin up before his parents come back.
3. To cease being happy, merry, flippant, or distracted; to become serious or solemn. When the chief put the pictures of the victims up on the white board, the whole room sobered up.
4. To cause or compel someone to cease being happy, merry, flippant, or distracted; to make someone serious or solemn. We were all goofing around during practice until the coach threw a chair through the window—that sobered us up straight away.
5. To give up drinking alcohol or taking drugs as a means of dealing with or overcoming one's addiction. I sobered up ten years ago to save my marriage, and I haven't looked since. Instead of simply throwing everyone in prison, why not offer programs to help some of these addicts sober up and start leading productive lives?
See also: sober, up

*sober as a judge

 
1. Cliché very formal, somber, or stuffy. (*Also: as ~.) You certainly look gloomy, Bill. You're sober as a judge. Tom's as sober as a judge. I think he's angry.
2. Cliché not drunk; alert and completely sober. (*Also: as ~.) John's drunk? No, he's as sober as a judge. You should be sober as a judge when you drive a car.
See also: judge, sober

sober someone up

 
1. Lit. to take actions that will cause a drunken person to become sober. some coffee ought to sober him up. He tried to sober himself up because he had to drive home. They tried to sober up the guys who had been out all night.
2. Fig. to cause someone to face reality. The harsh reality of what had happened sobered him up immediately. The arrival of the police sobered up all the revelers.
See also: sober, up

sober up

to recover from alcohol or drug intoxication. Barlowe had one hour to sober up and get to the station. It took him a while to sober up.
See also: sober, up

stone(–cold) sober

 and cold sober
absolutely sober. I am stone-cold sober, or I will be by morning anyway. I found the secret to waking up cold sober. Don't drink.
See also: sober, stone

sober as a judge

Not at all intoxicated, quite clear-headed, as in Even after three drinks he was sober as a judge. Why judges should be equated with sobriety is not known, but the simile was first recorded in 1694.
See also: judge, sober

sober as a judge

BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If someone is as sober as a judge, they have drunk no alcohol at all. For five years I was as sober as a judge.
See also: judge, sober

appeal from Philip drunk to Philip sober

ask someone to reconsider, with the suggestion that an earlier opinion or decision represented only a passing mood.
This phrase comes from an anecdote told by the Roman historian and moralist Valerius Maximus concerning an unjust judgement given by King Philip of Macedon : the woman condemned by Philip declared that she would appeal to him once again, but this time when he was sober.
See also: appeal, drunk, sober

sober as a judge

completely sober.
See also: judge, sober

(as) sober as a ˈjudge

not at all affected by alcohol: I was driving, so of course I was sober as a judge. OPPOSITE: (as) drunk as a lord
See also: judge, sober

ˌstone-cold ˈsober

having drunk no alcohol at all: By the time I arrived at the party, everyone else had had quite a few drinks, whereas I was stone-cold sober. OPPOSITE: blind drunk
See also: sober

sober up

v.
1. To have one's feeling of intoxication subside: I waited until I had sobered up and then drove home.
2. To cause someone's feeling of intoxication to subside: The jailer grabbed a pail of water and a cup of coffee to sober up the drunk. That nap really sobered me up, but I still have a hangover.
3. To overcome an alcohol or drug addiction: It wasn't until I had sobered up that I was able hold a steady job.
4. To become serious, grave, or solemn: Everyone sobered up and felt ashamed when they heard the bad news.
5. To make someone or something serious, grave, or solemn: The news of the disaster sobered them up. The accident sobered up the workers, reminding them how dangerous their job was.
See also: sober, up

(as) sober as a judge

mod. as sober (free from alcohol) as it is possible to be. Kelly—who was starched as could be—claimed to be sober as a judge.
See also: judge, sober

sober as a judge

verb
See also: judge, sober

cold sober

mod. sober; completely sober. (see also sold cober.) He had a fine head on and wanted more than anything to be cold sober and alert.
See also: cold, sober

sober up

in. to recover from alcohol or drug intoxication. Marlowe had one hour to sober up and get to the station.
See also: sober, up

stone (cold) sober

mod. absolutely sober. I am stone cold sober, or I will be by morning anyway.
See also: cold, sober, stone

stone sober

verb
See also: sober, stone
References in periodicals archive ?
Determining individual characteristics that may affect the result of a treatment in high-risk cases enables the treatment team to develop a more proper intervention model by reviewing case management, to track the cases more often and more closely, and to increase the ratio of maintaining soberness.
But if the Israelis have any lingering doubts about the soberness and earnestness with which this latest offer was made, they should step back and look at the partners who have implicitly lent their backing to the initiative.
Watching a bad stoner movie is like arriving hours late at a beer blast - everybody else has already had a few, they're silly and sloshy and laughing breathlessly at jokes that you in your soberness know are just stupid.
Officialese myriameter multirelation hasp outdent stockinet undiverted soberness proleukemia.
The death of drummer Jon Lee knocked the band unconscious for a year and Feeder returned with an unfamiliar soberness that alienated many of their hardcore fans.
Chloe Conant watched with solemnity as the minister in her congregation excluded the unworthy, and her soberness reflected also her sense that she was not prepared to receive the Supper: "Oh I wished I was a Christian in heart, that I could sit down at the marriage supper of the Lamb and celebrate his matchless love.
ROYAL ASCOT, in its many guises and degrees of soberness, is when it becomes most clear that there are differing notions about what constitutes a good day at the races.
Adjourning to a scarred table in a dark bar west of the Newberry Library, across streets I had never been into and never went into again, we talked passionately for hours about author's revisions, about the all too soberness of sober second thoughts, about the sacredness of the creative process.
I know I am venturing into sacred territory for many patriotic Americans with such questions, and I assure you that I do so with soberness and concern at the reaction it may generate.
There is nothing that becommeth a maid better than soberness, silence, shamefastnes, and chastite, both of bodie and mind.
I especially disliked what I perceived--and continue to perceive--as the novel's championing of an ethical vision that favors undisciplined, rampant romanticism: a configuration of rights and wrongs that asks readers to admire intensity of feeling for its own sake, no matter how self-indulgent or irrational or harmful, and that asks readers to be fascinated with near-mad emotionalism as if such emotional extremity constituted a self-evidently higher mode of existence than everyday soberness and judicious thought.
They pointed out that it would inculcate in them virtues, such as soberness and industry, which were expected of inhabitants of free, capitalist societies.
That was an end of a period, of a way of looking at things, not just on my part, but an end to a kind of seriousness and urgency and soberness and lack of humor that in fact a lot of things had been.
838) has intensified since the epochal changes wrought by 1832, he nonetheless asserts that "in soberness and truth there has grown up a general confidence in a progress of mankind towards good, which seems to be justified by the most careful scrutiny of the past history of humanity from primitive barbarism to the present imperfect forms of civilisation" (pp.