sober

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Related to soberer: stand pat, Pertaining to
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(as) sober as a judge

1. To be stoic and reserved, perhaps even somber. Anita has been as sober as a judge ever since she heard of Marshall's death. The coach stood at the side of the field, sober as a judge, as the clock counted down on his team's championship ambitions.
2. To be calm and rational. We need someone who can consider these issues without their emotions interfering—you'll need to be as sober as a judge from beginning to end!
3. To be not at all intoxicated. I haven't been drinking at all, I swear! I'm as sober as a judge! John's remained sober as a judge ever since the car accident three years ago.
See also: judge, sober

a sobering thought

A thought or idea which is dispiriting, depressing, or traumatic. It's a sobering thought when you consider how many people go without clean water every day.
See also: sober, thought

appeal from Philip drunk to Philip sober

To urge one to rethink something. The phrase refers to King Philip II of Macedon, who made an unwelcome decision and was challenged with an appeal to "Philip sober." If you're unhappy with his decision, then why don't you appeal from Philip drunk to Philip sober?
See also: appeal, drunk, sober

be (as) sober as a judge

1. To be stoic and reserved, perhaps even somber. Anita has been sober as a judge ever since she heard of Marshall's death.
2. To be calm and rational. He's usually as sober as a judge, so I'm confident that he'll make a sound decision.
3. To be not at all intoxicated. I haven't been drinking at all, I swear! I'm sober as a judge!
See also: judge, sober

cold sober

Completely sober; not intoxicated to any degree by drugs or alcohol. I'm cold sober, so I'll drive us home. No, I'm not high—I've been cold sober from the day I started working here!
See also: cold, sober

sober up

1. To recover from the effects of alcohol or drugs on one's body or mind. I need to sober up soon—I can't go into work staggering around like this! We decided to go take a walk in the cool night air to sober up a little before heading home.
2. To help or cause someone to recover from the effects of alcohol or drugs on one's body or mind. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "sober" and "up." Go make a pot of coffee! We need to sober Kevin up before his parents come back.
3. To cease being happy, merry, flippant, or distracted; to become serious or solemn. When the chief put the pictures of the victims up on the white board, the whole room sobered up.
4. To cause or compel someone to cease being happy, merry, flippant, or distracted; to make someone serious or solemn. We were all goofing around during practice until the coach threw a chair through the window—that sobered us up straight away.
5. To give up drinking alcohol or taking drugs as a means of dealing with or overcoming one's addiction. I sobered up ten years ago to save my marriage, and I haven't looked since. Instead of simply throwing everyone in prison, why not offer programs to help some of these addicts sober up and start leading productive lives?
See also: sober, up

stone sober

Completely sober; not intoxicated to any degree by drugs or alcohol. I'm stone sober, so I'll drive us home. No, I'm not high—I've been stone sober from the day I started working here!
See also: sober, stone

stone-cold sober

Completely sober; not intoxicated to any degree by drugs or alcohol. I'm stone-cold sober, so I'll drive us home. No, I'm not high—I've been stone-cold sober from the day I started working here!
See also: sober

wanton kittens make sober cats

One who behaves wildly in youth often shows more restraint in adulthood. I wouldn't worry too much about your son's interest in partying—wanton kittens make sober cats most of the time.
See also: cat, kitten, make, sober

*sober as a judge

 
1. Cliché very formal, somber, or stuffy. (*Also: as ~.) You certainly look gloomy, Bill. You're sober as a judge. Tom's as sober as a judge. I think he's angry.
2. Cliché not drunk; alert and completely sober. (*Also: as ~.) John's drunk? No, he's as sober as a judge. You should be sober as a judge when you drive a car.
See also: judge, sober

sober someone up

 
1. Lit. to take actions that will cause a drunken person to become sober. some coffee ought to sober him up. He tried to sober himself up because he had to drive home. They tried to sober up the guys who had been out all night.
2. Fig. to cause someone to face reality. The harsh reality of what had happened sobered him up immediately. The arrival of the police sobered up all the revelers.
See also: sober, up

sober up

to recover from alcohol or drug intoxication. Barlowe had one hour to sober up and get to the station. It took him a while to sober up.
See also: sober, up

stone(–cold) sober

 and cold sober
absolutely sober. I am stone-cold sober, or I will be by morning anyway. I found the secret to waking up cold sober. Don't drink.
See also: sober, stone

sober as a judge

Not at all intoxicated, quite clear-headed, as in Even after three drinks he was sober as a judge. Why judges should be equated with sobriety is not known, but the simile was first recorded in 1694.
See also: judge, sober

sober as a judge

BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If someone is as sober as a judge, they have drunk no alcohol at all. For five years I was as sober as a judge.
See also: judge, sober

appeal from Philip drunk to Philip sober

ask someone to reconsider, with the suggestion that an earlier opinion or decision represented only a passing mood.
This phrase comes from an anecdote told by the Roman historian and moralist Valerius Maximus concerning an unjust judgement given by King Philip of Macedon : the woman condemned by Philip declared that she would appeal to him once again, but this time when he was sober.
See also: appeal, drunk, sober

sober as a judge

completely sober.
See also: judge, sober

(as) sober as a ˈjudge

not at all affected by alcohol: I was driving, so of course I was sober as a judge. OPPOSITE: (as) drunk as a lord
See also: judge, sober

ˌstone-cold ˈsober

having drunk no alcohol at all: By the time I arrived at the party, everyone else had had quite a few drinks, whereas I was stone-cold sober. OPPOSITE: blind drunk
See also: sober

sober up

v.
1. To have one's feeling of intoxication subside: I waited until I had sobered up and then drove home.
2. To cause someone's feeling of intoxication to subside: The jailer grabbed a pail of water and a cup of coffee to sober up the drunk. That nap really sobered me up, but I still have a hangover.
3. To overcome an alcohol or drug addiction: It wasn't until I had sobered up that I was able hold a steady job.
4. To become serious, grave, or solemn: Everyone sobered up and felt ashamed when they heard the bad news.
5. To make someone or something serious, grave, or solemn: The news of the disaster sobered them up. The accident sobered up the workers, reminding them how dangerous their job was.
See also: sober, up

(as) sober as a judge

mod. as sober (free from alcohol) as it is possible to be. Kelly—who was starched as could be—claimed to be sober as a judge.
See also: judge, sober

sober as a judge

verb
See also: judge, sober

cold sober

mod. sober; completely sober. (see also sold cober.) He had a fine head on and wanted more than anything to be cold sober and alert.
See also: cold, sober

sober up

in. to recover from alcohol or drug intoxication. Marlowe had one hour to sober up and get to the station.
See also: sober, up

stone (cold) sober

mod. absolutely sober. I am stone cold sober, or I will be by morning anyway.
See also: cold, sober, stone

stone sober

verb
See also: sober, stone

sober as a judge

In full possession of one’s faculties; not at all intoxicated. The equation of judges and sobriety was made long ago. An early appearance in print is in Terence Made English (1694) by an unknown author: “I thought myself sober as a judge.” It remains current on both sides of the Atlantic.
See also: judge, sober
References in periodicals archive ?
In his soberer moments, Hartman really does not mean self-regulating by autonomy, rather, he means self-directing as in second-order desires, which are controlled by critically arrived-at values, directing first-order desires.
Julio Soberer, a respected journalist widely considered one of the "fathers" of investigative reporting in Mexico, rejected the award the jury gave him for "lifetime achievements." For 20 years, Soberer was director of the opposition magazine Proceso, which endured constant government pressure and faced threats and criticism from officials.
It is the soberer, less dramatic business of administering resources and plants already at hand." Even the New Deal ambiguity as to what was to remain local and what was to be nationalized, is played out by Loeb.
Although I have not researched the question fully, it seems abundantly clear that Exeter, like Lancashire, was a place in which the "soberer sort of people" were resented by those who were poorer and less pious than they.
Marge Soberer is Managing Editor of Educational Leadership.
Soberer scholars like Grinsell (1953 etc.) and myself admit that beorg in Wessex appreciably often names natural hills; the argument has been with those like the late G.B.
Hampered by the setback of the Thirty Years' War, the breakthrough of sobering-up came only after 1700, when coffee, the "great soberer," swept into the vinous gatherings of noblemen and the bourgeoisie, and more individualistic styles of drunkenness--including a further increase in the consumption of brandy--replaced the rigid rules of the "archaic drinking bout." The bout was itself transformed into a frivolous game of youngsters, and especially of students.(67)
I was going to be soberer, I assure you, but now have only room to add, that if the fates allot you a serene hour, don't fail to communicate some of its serenity to your friend,
There is a growing impression in the country that Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto has emerged wiser and soberer from her two-and-a-half-year political 'Vanaparasth' and is looking more mature and realistically - disposed than in her previous term.
It is the soberer, less dramatic business of administering resources and plants already in hand, of seeking to reestablish foreign markets for our surplus production, of meeting the problem of underconsumption, of adjusting production to consumption .
For example, here's how Posner dismisses Bleak House, the greatest legal novel ever wr"Someone who wants to learn about the nineteenth-cenwry English chancery court is not likely to spend much time on Bleak House, because there are fuller and soberer sources of data."
bring back all sorts of gorgeous plunder considerably nearer in hue and texture to the flaming shop-windows of Fifth Avenue than to those soberer ones of Bond and Regent Streets.
Collectively, chocolate, tea, and coffee ushered Europeans out of their inebriated past and heralded a soberer future.
Whitman's own exuberant version of a Hegelian-Emersonian faith in freedom as self-development gave way, in the atmosphere of the Washington hospitals especially, to a soberer view of the intimacies that could be expected to matter, in poetry and in life.