so to speak


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so to speak

A phrase used to indicate that what one has just said is an uncommon, metaphorical, or original way of saying something. Similar to the phrases "if you will" and "in a manner of speaking." He was a fixer, so to speak—a man who could get things done. This arrangement will allow us to eliminate our debt and get back to solid ground, so to speak.
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so to speak

as one might say; said a certain way, even though the words are not exactly accurate. John helps me with my taxes. He's my accountant, so to speak. I just love my little poodle. she's my baby, so to speak.
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so to speak

Phrased like this, in a manner of speaking, as in He was, so to speak, the head of the family, although he was only related by marriage to most of the family members . This term originally meant "in the vernacular" or "lower-class language" and was used as an aristocrat's apology for stooping to such use. [Early 1800s] Also see as it were.
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so to speak

used to highlight the fact that you are describing something in an unusual or metaphorical way.
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ˌso to ˈspeak

(also ˌas it ˈwere) used to emphasize that you are expressing something in an unusual or amusing way: They were all very similar. All cut from the same cloth, so to speak.Night fell and the city became, as it were, a different place entirely.
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so to speak

Used to call attention to a choice of words, and especially to the metaphoric or expressive nature of a word or phrase: can't see the forest for the trees, so to speak.
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so to speak

Put in this way; in a manner of speaking. This phrase once meant “in the vernacular” or “in dialect,” and was used by aristocrats in the early 1800s as an apology for stooping to use lower-class language. However, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used it to apologize for high-flown language: “I occupied the same chamber that you did in former times, for it seemed to be the very highest point of the dwelling, the apogee, so to speak” (letter of March 2, 1824).
See also: speak