snuff

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not up to snuff

Not as good as what was expected, required, or demanded; not satisfactory or adequate. Jim, I know you've been going through a tough time since your wife passed, but these reports just aren't up to snuff. I used to eat there all the time, but to be honest, their food hasn't been up to snuff recently.
See also: not, snuff, up

snuff movie

A film that shows the actual murder or death of a person. Although snuff films are illegal, they are still widely circulated on the black market.
See also: movie, snuff

up to par

As good as what was expected, required, or demanded; satisfactory or adequate. A: "How's your dinner?" B: "It's up to par with this place's usual standard." It's nice to see that Jenny's work is up to par again lately.
See also: par, up

up to scratch

As good as what was expected, required, or demanded; satisfactory or adequate. A: "How's your dinner?" B: "It's up to scratch with this place's usual standard." It's nice to see that Jenny's work is up to scratch again lately.
See also: scratch, up

up to snuff

As good as what was expected, required, or demanded; satisfactory or adequate. A: "How's your dinner?" B: "It's up to snuff with this place's usual standard." It's nice to see that Jenny's work is up to snuff again lately.
See also: snuff, up

not up to scratch and not up to snuff

Fig. not adequate. Sorry, your paper isn't up to scratch. Please do it over again. The performance was not up to snuff.
See also: and, not, scratch, snuff, up

snuff someone out

Sl. to kill someone. Max really wanted to snuff the eyewiteness out, once and for all. Lefty wanted to snuff out his partner.
See also: out, snuff

snuff something out

to extinguish something, such as a flame. she snuffed all the candles out and went to bed. Karen snuffed out the flames one by one.
See also: out, snuff

up to par

Fig. as good as the standard or average; up to standard. I'm just not feeling up to par today. I must be coming down with something. The manager said that the report was not up to par and gave it back to Mary to do over again.
See also: par, up

up to snuff

 and up to scratch
Fig. as good as is required; meeting the minimum requirements. Sorry, Tom. Your performance isn't up to snuff. You'll have to improve or find another job. My paper wasn't up to scratch, so I got an F.
See also: snuff, up

snuff out

1. Extinguish, put a sudden end to, as in Three young lives were snuffed out in that automobile accident. This usage alludes to snuff in the sense of "put out a candle by pinching the wick," an area itself called snuff from the late 1300s on. [Mid-1800s]
2. Kill, murder, as in If he told the police, the gang would snuff him out. [Slang; first half of 1900s]
3. Also, snuff it. Die or be killed, as in He looked very ill indeed, as though he might snuff out any day, or Grandpa just snuffed it. [Slang; second half of 1800s]
See also: out, snuff

up to par

Also, up to scratch or snuff or speed or the mark . Satisfactory, up to a given standard, as in She didn't feel up to par today so she stayed home, or I'm sure he'll come up to scratch when the time comes, or She's up to snuff again. Nearly all the versions of this idiom come from sports, par from golf, scratch and mark from boxing (after being knocked down a fighter had eight seconds to make his way to a mark scratched in the center of the ring), and speed from racing. However, the allusion in the variant with snuff, which dates from the early 1800s, has been lost.
See also: par, up

up to snuff

BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If something or someone is up to snuff, they are as good as they should be or as they normally are. The technology in these companies simply isn't up to snuff. Note: You can also say that you bring or get someone or something up to snuff or that someone or something comes up to snuff. The hamburgers didn't come up to snuff.
See also: snuff, up

snuff out

v.
1. To extinguish something: The altar server snuffed out the candles. I saw her snuff a match out with her fingers.
2. To put a sudden end to something: The war has snuffed out many young lives. I had a promising career as a dancer, but a tragic injury snuffed it out.
3. Slang To kill someone; murder someone: The police accused the widow of snuffing out her husband. The gangsters snuffed him out before he could testify in court.
See also: out, snuff

snuff film

n. a film that records an actual death or killing. Some of these snuff films have a loyal following of real sickies.
See also: film, snuff

snuff it

tv. to die. The cat leapt straight up in the air and snuffed it.
See also: snuff

snuff someone (out)

tv. to kill someone. Max really wanted to snuff the eyewitness out, once and for all.
See also: out, snuff

snuff someone

verb
See also: snuff

up to scratch

and up to snuff
mod. satisfactory; up to what is expected. (Colloquial. Snuff is related in some way to tobacco. Scratch may allude to the starting or finish line in a contest.) We felt that the entertainment was not up to scratch. The food was up to snuff, but the hotel staff was not at its usually efficient best.
See also: scratch, up

up to snuff

verb
See also: snuff, up

up to scratch

Informal
1. Meeting the requirements.
2. In fit condition.
See also: scratch, up

up to snuff

Informal
1. Normal in health.
2. Up to standard; adequate.
See also: snuff, up

up to scratch

Meets the standards. In the days of bare-knuckle fighting, bouts took place within a large circle drawn on the bare ground (that's where the phrase “boxing ring” came from). The contest began with the fighters facing off while standing on either side of a line scratched on the dirt in the middle of the ring. A fighter who was physically and mentally ready to take part stood at the line and was, therefore, up to scratch. “Up to snuff ” has much the same meaning. Powdered tobacco was said to sharpen the user's mind, so if you were up to snuff, you were mentally and also physically ready to go.
See also: scratch, up
References in periodicals archive ?
Keane's grandparents spoke yesterday of the joyful little girl who loved to dance, but whose life was snuffed out by an unstable wall pupils had often warned teachers about.
Re "The teen who snuffed out smoking in Calabasas" (March 17):
A civic tradition dating back to the 1800s could be snuffed out because of moves to cut tobacco.
A civic tradition dating back to 1815 could be snuffed out because of moves to cut tobacco.
The well told tale is still quite true That smoking tobacco can kill you Your breathing will become weaker and weaker And your life span will also get shorter Give up now before it is too late Before you become a hospital case Once you give up smoking, life becomes brighter You now can dispose of your old fag lighter From then on your food will taste better And your body will get a lot fitter Gone will be the craving of dying for a smoke Now the smoking habit you have finally broke You now have snuffed the fags out Before the fags snuffed you out
Some of the saved money will be used by drug firms to fund campaigns aimed at curtailing 110,000 "unwanted" pregnancies in Canada, as they call the lives of unborn snuffed out by abortion.
The two snuffed out "hot spots"-smoldering areas that could flame up again.
After chemically analyzing the foam, they found that it contained a mixture of salts resulting from reactions between the oil and the extinguishing agents, thus confirming how the flames get snuffed.
While this chilly environment has not snuffed out sex, its effects are visible.
Ayr's Martyn snuffed out the Rovers attack while fellow centre-half Mark helped the Kirkcaldy side to a comfortable clean sheet.
Henry Morgentaler went on record proudly saying that he personally had snuffed out 65,000 lives while another 100,000 lives had been terminated in his eight Canadian abortuaries (Editor:pro-life translation of M's terminology).
Firefighters said it would be another week before the last embers were snuffed and the Topanga and Burbank fires declared officially dead.