snow

(redirected from snowing)
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have snow on the mountain

To have silver, grey, or white hair on one's head, as due to aging. Sure, I may have a bit of snow on the mountain, but I still lead as adventurous a life as I ever have!
See also: have, mountain, on, snow

snow on the mountain

Silver, grey, or white hair on one's head, as due to aging. Sure, there's a bit of snow on the mountain, but I still lead as adventurous a life as I ever have!
See also: mountain, on, snow

snow on the roof

Silver, grey, or white hair on one's head, as due to aging. Sure, there's a bit of snow on the roof, but I still lead as adventurous a life as I ever have!
See also: on, roof, snow

snow job

A form of manipulation that involves lying or flattery to persuade someone. He laid the compliments on her so thick, it was surprising that she couldn't see that it was nothing more than a snow job.
See also: job, snow

roast snow in a furnace

To attempt a futile, often ridiculous, task. You're so tiny that there's no way you can carry that armchair upstairs all by yourself—you might as well roast snow in a furnace!
See also: roast, snow

be (as) pure as the driven snow

To be virtuous and/or chaste. The bride looked as pure as the driven snow in her gown. Kate would never cheat on an exam—she's pure as the driven snow.
See also: driven, pure, snow

be (as) white as snow

1. To have a very pale face, often due to illness or fear. I knew that Maureen wasn't feeling well because her face was white as snow. Everyone in the band was as white as snow before taking the stage.
2. To be very white in color. Now that my grandfather has stopped dying his hair, it's as white as snow.
See also: snow, white

be snowed under

To be very busy or overwhelmed with something. This phrase evokes the image of being buried under an avalanche. I'd love to go out to dinner tonight, but I'm totally snowed under at the office right now. Kate's not coming tonight because she's snowed under with research for her thesis.
See also: snow

have snow on the roof

To have silver, grey, or white hair on one's head, as due to aging. Sure, I may have a bit of snow on the roof, but my life is as adventurous as ever!
See also: have, on, roof, snow

snowed under

Very busy or overwhelmed with something. This phrase evokes the image of being buried under an avalanche. I'd love to go out to dinner tonight, but I'm totally snowed under at the office right now. Kate's not coming tonight because she's snowed under with research for her thesis.
See also: snow

*pure as the driven snow

pure and chaste. (Often used ironically. *Also: as ~.) Jill: Sue must have gone to bed with every man in town. Jane: And I always thought she was as pure as the driven snow. Robert was notoriously promiscuous, but tried to convince all his girlfriends that he was pure as the driven snow.
See also: driven, pure, snow

snow bunny

 
1. someone learning to ski. This little slope is for snow bunnies. Most of the snow bunnies come here to socialize.
2. a young, attractive female at a skiing lodge. some cute little snow bunny came over and sat beside me. This place is swarming with snow bunnies who have never even seen a ski.
See also: bunny, snow

snow job

a systematic deception; a deceptive story that tries to hide the truth. You can generally tell when a student is trying to do a snow job. This snow job you call an explanation just won't do.
See also: job, snow

snow someone or something in

[for heavy snowfall] to block someone or something in a place. The sudden storm snowed us in. The storm snowed in most of the people in town.
See also: snow

snow someone or something under with something

 and snow someone or something under
to burden someone or something with something. (Usually too much work.) The busy season snowed us all under with too much work. The heavy workload snowed under the office staff.
See also: snow

snowed in

trapped (somewhere) because of too much snow. The snow was so deep that we were snowed in for three days. Being snowed in is no problem if you have enough food.
See also: snow

snowed under

overworked; exceptionally busy. Look, I'm really snowed under at the moment. Can this wait? He really has been snowed under with work.
See also: snow

*white as a sheet

 and *white as a ghost; *white as snow; *white as the driven snow
[of someone] extremely pale, as if frightened. (*Also: as ~.) Marilyn turned as white as a sheet when the policeman told her that her son had been in a car wreck. Did something scare you? You're white as a sheet! Jane made up the bed with her best linen sheets, which are always as white as snow. We have a new kitten whose fur is white as the driven snow.
See also: sheet, white

pure as the driven snow

Morally unsullied, chaste, as in She's just sixteen and pure as the driven snow. This simile dates from the late 1500s, although driven, which means "carried by the wind into drifts," was occasionally omitted. It is heard less often today.
See also: driven, pure, snow

snow job

An effort to deceive, persuade, or overwhelm with insincere talk. For example, Peter tried to give the officer a snow job about an emergency at the hospital but he got a speeding ticket all the same . This slangy expression, originating in the military during World War II, presumably alludes to the idiom snow under.
See also: job, snow

snow under

Overwhelm, overpower, as in I can't go; I'm just snowed under with work, or We were snowed under by more votes than we could have anticipated. This expression alludes to being buried in snow. [Late 1800s]
See also: snow

white as a sheet

Very pale in the face, as in She was white as a sheet after that near encounter. This simile, dating from about 1600, survives despite the fact that bedsheets now come in all colors.
See also: sheet, white

a snow job

mainly AMERICAN
A snow job is an attempt to deceive someone by telling many lies or by giving praise that is not sincere. Critics say a vast public relations snow job has been launched to convince the public of the need for the project.
See also: job, snow

white as a sheet

or

white as a ghost

If someone looks as white as a sheet or as white as a ghost, they look very pale because they are frightened, shocked or ill. When I saw him his face was as white as a sheet and he was crying. She was as white as a ghost and trembling all over.
See also: sheet, white

white as snow

If something is as white as snow, it is very white in colour. Aged 90, her hair is now as white as snow.
See also: snow, white

snow in

v.
1. To cause something to be inoperable or unable to move safely due to snow. Used chiefly in the passive: The airport was snowed in, and no flights left that day. The school buses were snowed in, so classes were canceled.
2. To cause someone or something to remain inside due to snow: The blizzard had snowed in all the townspeople, and all the restaurants were closed. A sudden storm had snowed us in, and we were worried that we would run out of food.
3. To cause something to be surrounded by snow: The storm snowed in the mountain and confined the climbers to their tents. One winter, a blizzard snowed their cabin in, and they had to tunnel out the window.
See also: snow

snow out

v.
To force the cancellation or postponement of some event because of snow. Used chiefly in the passive: With this blizzard coming, the concert will be snowed out.
See also: out, snow

snow under

v.
1. To cover or bury someone or something in snow: A big storm snowed the explorers under in their tents, and they couldn't leave for days. The blizzard snowed under the entire forest. The skiers were snowed under by the avalanche.
2. To overwhelm someone or something. Used chiefly in the passive: I was snowed under with homework.
3. To defeat someone or something by a very large margin. Used chiefly in the passive: The candidate was snowed under by a margin of 3 to 1.
See also: snow

do a snow job on someone

tv. to deceive or confuse someone. She thought she did a snow job on the teacher, but it backfired.
See also: job, on, snow

have snow on the roof

phr. to have white or much gray hair. Come on, judge, you’ve had hair on the roof for years!
See also: have, on, roof, snow

Lady Snow

n. cocaine. (Drugs.) I spent the afternoon with Lady Snow.
See also: lady, snow

snow

1. n. deceitful talk; deception. All I heard for an hour was snow. Now, what’s the truth?
2. tv. to attempt to deceive someone. (see also snowed.) You can try to snow me if you want, but I’m onto your tricks.
3. and snowball and snowflakes and snow stuff n. a powdered or crystalline narcotic: morphine, heroin, or cocaine. (Now almost always the latter.) The price of snow stuff has come down a lot as South America exports more of it.

snow stuff

verb
See snow
See also: snow, stuff

snow bunny

1. n. someone learning to ski. Most of the snow bunnies come here to socialize.
2. n. a female skier. This place is swarming with snow bunnies who have never even seen a ski.
3. n. a cocaine user. How can these suburban snow bunnies afford such big habits?
See also: bunny, snow

snow job

n. a systematic deception. You can generally tell when a student is trying to do a snow job.
See also: job, snow

snowed

mod. deceived. He was one snowed coach. He still doesn’t know what really happened.
See also: snow
References in periodicals archive ?
Once it starts snowing, it kicks the phones for reservations .
It was snowing hard at the 8,200-foot summit of the East Resort, and meticulously groomed Goldrush held up marvelously throughout its 1,600-foot vertical drop.
It's wonderful to ski in fresh snow or while it's snowing,'' explained Judy Over, education director at the headquarters of the National Ski Patrol in Loveland, Colo.
When it's snowing it's the best way to learn to ski powder, because you can slowly learn the technique as it keeps getting deeper,'' Kazmark said.
It might be fun to ski when it's snowing,'' said Judy Over, education director for the National Ski Patrol, headquartered in Lakewood, Colo.
Some find the best ski days - and shortest lines - when it's snowing.